New Roof in Atlanta?


#1

Well, this forum proves that you can find just about anything on the internet. Thanks for taking the time to help folks out. Now, on to my questions…

I am in a suburb of Atlanta and my house was constructed about 14 years ago. It has the original 3 tab shingle roof which is leaking (from toe board holes which were not properly sealed) and has caused rot in one area. My gut feeling is to bite the bullet and go ahead and replace the roof, as I am near the end of it’s expected life.

Here are front and back look at the house (the photos were taken when we purchased it four years ago:

[size=150]MY ROOF[/size]

On this page I included the types of product the contractors are recommending.

I have had four companies come out and give proposals., which are similar - but a few differences.

Everyone has proposed ice/water shield in all valleys and I understand that, but no one has proposed it along the eaves or other areas. Is this reasonable in the Atlanta area?

No one has proposed drip edge on any surface unless they see that it is an area that “critters” may be entering the house. Again, is this correct?

I have two spots on the roof where one slope dead ends into a vertical wall. One is about 3 feet deep and one is about six fet deep. Most folks called it a dead valley, but one called it a cricket. Currently it has standard roofing on it with flashing/step flashing against the vertical surfaces. There are no current signs of leakage. Two said just replace the roof in the current configuration, one wants to use a commercial bitumen roof membrane to crate a “pan” in these areas and one wants to change the slope of the roof in the deep one. Any thoughts on how these areas should be handled.

There are currently soffet vents around the perimeter of the entire house with two power vents and two gable vents for the exhaust. One of the power vents is high on a vaulted ceiling, so I can’t see where it is allowing much exhaust and I have never seen the the other work, including August in Hotlanta. All agree to change to a ridge vent and cover over the power vents. All but one say leave the gable vents open. Thoughts?

Again, let me thank any of you in advance for your thoughts. If you ever need questions answered about pop up camping, I’m your guy :mrgreen:


#2

Hi,

Why not fix the problem and get the rest of the shingle life out of it?


#3

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

Why not fix the problem and get the rest of the shingle life out of it?[/quote]

This is actually the third spot where toe board holes have opened up. Maybe I’m wrong, but I’d rather bite the bullet now and fix the entire thing.

Even if I could get them to replace the sheets rotted and re-shingle for $1,000 that’s 10- 15% of the cost of an entire new roof, which will need to be replaced in another four or so years.

Additionally, I do have critters getting into the attic - hence the drip edge question.


#4

A very nice home, I hope your roofer takes good care of it.

I don’t know the codes in your area.
If code says to apply Ice & water shield to the eaves then it should be applied.
From a functional standpoint, no you do not need Ice & water shield on your eaves, in this case ( on the eaves ) it is for ice dams.
The valleys should have it, like they all said.
The crickets should have it also.

In some regions it is normal not to use a drip edge.
I think you are in one of those regions.
If your house does not currently have a drip edge on it, it was probably built in such a way as not to need one.
In my area we always use drip edge, unless it is a specific architectural detail of the house not to have it, if so the facia is framed a little different than what is normal here.
The way houses are commonly built in my area requires a drip edge to protect the edge of the sheeting from the weather, or to hold the top of aluminum/vinyl facia in place.
If you can see the edge of your roof sheeting, a drip edge is a good idea.
A nice copper drip edge would look very nice on your home though, think about it…

We cannot see this area, so we will have to rely on what we can glean from your description.
If this area already has a cricket, it will probably be fine as is.
That means that when the builder built this home they thought about this area and addressed the potential problem already.
You said that it has not leaked.
If left as is, this area should get a healthy dose of Ice & water shield also.

One roofer wants to change the slope on the deep one?
So he feels that the 3’ one is fine as is.
We cannot see either of them, so we cannot tell if this is right or wrong.
I am leaning towards it being the right thing to do, though possibly not necessary.
To change the slope of the deeper one will involve re flashing that brick wall.
This is time consuming so he must feel it to be needed.

Another roofer wants to apply Modified Bitumen to this area?
Modified is a good solution to these types of areas also.
It is waterproof, if done right.
And it is quite durable.
It can be unsightly, so we try not to use it if we don’t have to, in visible areas.
Perhaps this roofer doesn’t want to take any chances with the old wall flashings, nor wants to install new ones.
A good safe way to do it.

The other 2 feel the crickets are fine as is.
Again, we cannot see these areas…
It is quite possible to leave these areas as is, they don’t leak now…
If they can get their Ice & water shield “up the wall” a few inches, and redo the existing corners ( inside & outside ) without too much problem this will work fine also.
It is working fine now.
It all depends of what is currently there for them to work with.

If you were in the snow belt I would recommend the modified to guard against ice & snow build up.
You are in “Hotlanta” so any of the above solutions should work well, done properly of course.

We love discussing ventilation here, it is a rather inexact science…
I don’t see any power or gable vents in the posted pics.
If you have true vaulted ceilings, power vents are not doing anything but burning out…

First of all, your venting will not work at all if there is not a clear air passage from the soffits to the ridge.
This needs to be checked.
If you do have clear air passage, a combination of soffit vents ( which you already have ) and ridge vents should work well.
With this system you are supposed to close off other vents for it to work best.

If you do not have clear air passage from soffit to ridge, you will need rafter vents installed.
The re roofing process is the best (sometimes only ) time to do this.
The vaulted portions will need them installed all the way from eave to peak.
This will involve removing approx 1/2 of the roof deck usually.
The portions that are truss construction ( you have attic space usually ) will just need enough rafter venting to allow clear air flow.
This usually just involves removing the sheeting at the eaves.
This is definitely going to be an extra charge.
You have a hip roof over the main portion of your home, these can be a little tricky to get to breath well.

You may want to ask the roofers to also bid for this possibility, this can be a considerable amount of extra work, and has a large effect on how they will approach this job.
It is not usually something they can know for sure until they start work.

Given your shingle choices, I would choose the Durations.
A much better shingle IMO.
I always use Shinglevent II, but Cobravent 3 is a good product also, they are very similar.


#5

[quote="-Axiom-"] We cannot see this area, so we will have to rely on what we can glean from your description.
If this area already has a cricket, it will probably be fine as is.
That means that when the builder built this home they thought about this area and addressed the potential problem already.
You said that it has not leaked.
If left as is, this area should get a healthy dose of Ice & water shield also.

One roofer wants to change the slope on the deep one?
So he feels that the 3’ one is fine as is.
We cannot see either of them, so we cannot tell if this is right or wrong.
I am leaning towards it being the right thing to do, though possibly not necessary.
To change the slope of the deeper one will involve re flashing that brick wall.
This is time consuming so he must feel it to be needed.

Another roofer wants to apply Modified Bitumen to this area?
Modified is a good solution to these types of areas also.
It is waterproof, if done right.
And it is quite durable.
It can be unsightly, so we try not to use it if we don’t have to, in visible areas.
Perhaps this roofer doesn’t want to take any chances with the old wall flashings, nor wants to install new ones.
A good safe way to do it.

The other 2 feel the crickets are fine as is.
Again, we cannot see these areas…
It is quite possible to leave these areas as is, they don’t leak now…
If they can get their Ice & water shield “up the wall” a few inches, and redo the existing corners ( inside & outside ) without too much problem this will work fine also.
It is working fine now.
It all depends of what is currently there for them to work with.[/quote]

I was leaning toward the modified as the areas are totally invisible from the ground. I have to remember to climb up there in the fall to get the leaves out as they collect and decompose, so I can see water hanging around also.

[quote="-Axiom-"]If you have true vaulted ceilings, power vents are not doing anything but burning out…

First of all, your venting will not work at all if there is not a clear air passage from the soffits to the ridge.
This needs to be checked.
If you do have clear air passage, a combination of soffit vents ( which you already have ) and ridge vents should work well.
With this system you are supposed to close off other vents for it to work best.

If you do not have clear air passage from soffit to ridge, you will need rafter vents installed.
The re roofing process is the best (sometimes only ) time to do this.
The vaulted portions will need them installed all the way from eave to peak.
This will involve removing approx 1/2 of the roof deck usually.
The portions that are truss construction ( you have attic space usually ) will just need enough rafter venting to allow clear air flow.
This usually just involves removing the sheeting at the eaves.
This is definitely going to be an extra charge.
You have a hip roof over the main portion of your home, these can be a little tricky to get to breath well.[/quote]

From what I can tell, the builder dis a good job with the air flow. In every area I can physically get to I have found foam baffles from the soffit into the open air space. I agree that the one power vent is doing no good and needs to be replaced. Additionally, half the house has vaulted ceilings, so without the addition of vent ridge, these areas are not venting at all now.

Thanks


#6

[quote]Additionally, half the house has vaulted ceilings, so without the addition of vent ridge, these areas are not venting at all now.
[/quote]

These areas may not have been built with ventilation in mind, unfortunately these areas require the most labor to repair.
And they cannot be checked from the non existent attic.
I have been working on one of these for a while now, I see drastic improvements already.

Again, if there is not clear air passage in these areas, a ridgevent will not work.
I can’t imagine why someone would put a power vent in a vaulted ceiling…
It only vents one rafter.

roofing.com/forum/about6082-0-asc-0.html

Read the posts by Ed The Roofer, particularly the ones regarding the hip roof.
Very good stuff.


#7

[quote="-Axiom-"]
Again, if there is not clear air passage in these areas, a ridgevent will not work.
I can’t imagine why someone would put a power vent in a vaulted ceiling…
It only vents one rafter.[/quote]

My thought exactly. I have been able to get to the underside of several areas of vaulted ceiling (i.e. dead space along side bonus room over garage) as well as looking up under the vaulted areas from non vaulted areas. Every rafter that I can get to has a foam baffle.


#8

If you go with GAF, have them get you the Systems Plus warranty. It gives you extra years of non-pro rated coverage.

It only costs the contractor 50.00 or so, but if they are a Master Elite Contractor then they probably can get it for free. GAF alots an amount of free warranty upgrades to every Master Elite contractor.

Just make sure they use 3 GAF products. Shinglemate, Timbertex or SealARidge, weatherwatch, and/or Cobra, Snow country, or other vent product.


#9

“No one has proposed drip edge on any surface unless they see that it is an area that “critters” may be entering the house”.
now mr tim5055.
im glad you came here, cause his allmighty gweedo had a couple of unbeleivers a while back about roofers in the southeast united states not using eve drip,
preferein to just let the shingles heat up and droop
over the edge.

glad indeed.

so toe board nail holes should not be leaking.
unless they just stuck a nail in the hole instead of
tarin it.

if you can repair for a couple hundred
then do that, get a few more years.

good luck.

gweedo


#10

Where I can get the customers to spend the 2.99 - 3.49 per 10’ stick, I use DL drip edge on ALL my projects.

ALL edges.


#11

Its a shame someone put a 3tab on that nice of a home…


#12

I agree. For about the last 18 months I have been watching the houses around me slowly changing from 3 tab to architectural.


#13

It’s even worse that some dumbass architect felt the need to leave a dead valley in there.

It’s a LOT easier to just not build the house like that, but then it’s not their problem in how to actually make it work.

As my brother the Structural Engineer says, “Architect starts with the letter ‘A’. So does “Artist.” All architects seem to think they’re artists when in reality they’re that other ‘A’ word, ‘asshole.’”


#14

i too use eve drip on all my edges.
that doesnt change the fact that most roofers
in ga. dont like it.

it would be easier if someone just said
"you are the ever knowing allmighty roofing god gweedo".

just easier.

gweedo.


#15

You are the eternal space cadet, gweedo.


#16

Step away from the crack gweedo


#17

anything but crack gtp.
heroin, extacy, xanex,
anything but crack.

gweedo.


#18

You are alright in my book Gweedo.