New Roof - Improve Attic Ventilation


#1

I am in the early process of getting quotes for a replacement roof on my one and half story house. The roof is in fair condition but my primary reason for a new roof is to improve ventilation in the attic. I live in Oklahoma and there were a few times last year that the attic reached above 150 degrees and as you can imagine the bedrooms upstairs were quite uncomfortable and even placing small a/c in them did not help much. After reading lots on the internet and this forum and think a lot of my problems are due to poor/no attic ventilation.

The current ventilation situation with my roof is 2 turbines vents on the primary roof (south side) above garage which is the largest portion of the attic. The air airlets are the problem as there is only one and it is small (10â€


#2

Hi,

Smart Vent will be your best solution. Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052ikDqZh

Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent at a wall for exhaust vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052EyFnyM

Here is a link to Smart Vent’s site.

dciproducts.com/html/smartvent.htm


#3

Listen to Lefty…he knows his dooky.


#4

Well, the first contractor came out last night. He gave me an esimate for the roof and an estimate for adding a gable vent into the east and west sides. I asked him about other venting and inlet and he said that was all he would qoute.

The second contractor so far has only called and said he would only do a ridge vent, not gable vents.

From alot of the reading I have done it appears to me that a ridge vent does not do much good without soffits working with them. Is this correct? or can a ridge vent along with gables used as inlets work?


#5

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

Smart Vent will be your best solution. Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052ikDqZh

Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent at a wall for exhaust vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052EyFnyM

Here is a link to Smart Vent’s site.

dciproducts.com/html/smartvent.htm[/quote]

I’m not saying you’re right or wrong lefty.

Smart Vent intrigued me enough to call DCI for their installation instructions and a sample. So I get a little sales kit in the mail with the instructions included as promised and after reading the instructions, I still had the same concerns… “go X-amount of inches up the roof, chalk two lines, cut out the slit, install smart vent, roof over it.”

Okay, so then the next step is to install the ice and water barrier here in the North, but what is there to stop the damming from going between the smart vent and the roof deck? You see what I mean? Then the next step, put on the drip edge… is the smart vent still going to be able to breathe with the face of the drip edge covering it?

Don’t get defensive. I’m just wondering for myself what others think about how it works in cold weather climates.


#6

Hi,

Put the drip edge on first.

That is why I posted pictures.

It will not correct gutter problems.


#7

pramos67

The ridge vent and gable vent will help with attic ventilation, but will not be nearly as effective as having soffit vents also.
Some roofing contractors do not like installing soffit vents because it often requires setting scaffold under the eaves and cutting the soffit. Just a little out of their comfort zone. It is possible to install the soffit vents yourself. But it’s not a fun job. Think about looking up and having dirt and sawdust fall in your eyes.

As for the dci smartvent, if I had to, I would install the type that goes behind the gutter along the fascia, in a snowy climate. Cutting a hole in the roof deck near the eaves on a roof with potential ice damming could be a problem.


#8

[quote=“Severance & Gallant R”]

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

Smart Vent will be your best solution. Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052ikDqZh

Here is a link to us installing Smart Vent at a wall for exhaust vent.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 7052EyFnyM

Here is a link to Smart Vent’s site.

dciproducts.com/html/smartvent.htm[/quote]

I’m not saying you’re right or wrong lefty.

Smart Vent intrigued me enough to call DCI for their installation instructions and a sample. So I get a little sales kit in the mail with the instructions included as promised and after reading the instructions, I still had the same concerns… “go X-amount of inches up the roof, chalk two lines, cut out the slit, install smart vent, roof over it.”

Okay, so then the next step is to install the ice and water barrier here in the North, but what is there to stop the damming from going between the smart vent and the roof deck? You see what I mean? Then the next step, put on the drip edge… is the smart vent still going to be able to breathe with the face of the drip edge covering it?

Don’t get defensive. I’m just wondering for myself what others think about how it works in cold weather climates.[/quote]

:smiley: Thanks for the inquiry into SmartVent (and thanks for the kudos, Lefty!)! To clear things up let me start by explaining that SmartVent is designed for snowy New England climates and THE METAL DRIP EDGE GOES AGAINST THE WOOD DECKING BEFORE THE SMARTVENT. Look at the pictures in the magazines and the instructions before installing. It’s simple: drip edge first, second measure 6" to 7" up from drip edge corner and cut slit, third install SmartVent, fourth install ice shield, fifth install shingles. It only takes minutes to install SmartVent but lasts the lifetime of the roof. Thousands of straw like vent tubes suck air into your attic (that’s 144 straws per foot drawing air into your attic). Because the vent is three dimensional, when snow and ice are in the gutter, the parrallel vent channels pick up the required ventilation for winter. The SmartVent does not allow ice or snow to penetrate the system even in the snowiest of climates. Again, thanks for the interest and yes, all houses require intake!!!


#9

[quote=“dennis”]pramos67

The ridge vent and gable vent will help with attic ventilation, but will not be nearly as effective as having soffit vents also.
Some roofing contractors do not like installing soffit vents because it often requires setting scaffold under the eaves and cutting the soffit. Just a little out of their comfort zone. It is possible to install the soffit vents yourself. But it’s not a fun job. Think about looking up and having dirt and sawdust fall in your eyes.

As for the dci smartvent, if I had to, I would install the type that goes behind the gutter along the fascia, in a snowy climate. Cutting a hole in the roof deck near the eaves on a roof with potential ice damming could be a problem.[/quote]

Dennis,
SmartVent works great as intake in snow/ice climates BUT if you would like the FaciaVent instead that’s okay. Slightly more work than the SmartVent installation because of the gutter work. www.faciavent.com or go to the DCI home page and click on FaciaVent. Remember, we are in business to make your business work!


#10

The problem I am having is that I do not have soffits so it is hard to find someone that really knows what I should be doing for ventilation. I have one roofer that wants to do a ridge vent and one that only wants to do the gable vents. I really don’t have a preference of which one to use and the quotes from all the roofers so far have been within a $200 range so that doesn’t help rule one out. I just want to be sure I am getting the most ventilation I can.

The roofer that is wanting to put the gable vents in also wants to remove the turbine style vents on the roofs and put the little hat type of vents and have a 8 of them - is this normal or should I stick with the turbine if I stay with the gable vents?

Also, can anyone recommend a manufacturer of vinyl gable vents? The contractor that wants to use the gable vents only wants to use galvanized and says that is all he can get and he will just paint them. To me I do not like that as I don’t want to something I will have the maintenance of painting. If anyone knows of vents that work well with vinyl siding please let me know.


#11

Turbines don’t suck… that’s their problem. They are useless.

48 linear ft. of ridge vent (GAF Cobra III, anyhow) is equal to having 10 fully spinning turbines on the roof.

Here’s a suggestion, since it sounds like the Southern exposure isn’t street facing:

@ Least ONE, if not two GAF Intake Booster solar powered fans within 2’ of the eave & a full run of Cobra III on the ridge line.

Since it’s possible you have insulation blocking the gaps between your rafters & down @ the top of the headers, it’s going to be more than a little bit of work if you don’t have ‘real’ soffits.

This would involve

  • removing all your header caps between the rafters,
  • installing corrugated type baffles against the roof deck,
  • then installing whatever soffit product you intend to use &
  • adding vents if you don’t use something like a Hardie continuous run ventilated soffit.
  • painting of same.

An awful lot of labor & if I was doing two intakes with 48’ of Cobra III my total charge would be around 1,040.00 depending on variables (pitch, type of existing shingles, 2 Story, attic concerns, etc.).

…But that’s me.

Imagine that; a Longhorn giving advice to an Okie. :mrgreen:


#12

Thanks for the feedback - You are correct the southern exposure isn’t street facing. I looked on GAF’s website and I like what I read about the Intake Booster – if I understand this correctly this would eliminate the need for adding the gable vents in the west and end of the house?

Can you explain more about your following comments?

  • then installing whatever soffit product you intend to use &
  • adding vents if you don’t use something like a Hardie continuous run ventilated soffit.

I am not sure I understand these as I do not have any soffits on the house. This is how I am interpreting your feedback – while getting new roof install GAF Cobra III ridge vents and install a least 2 of the intake boosters. From what I see on GAF literature is says “do NOT use on homes without soffit ventsâ€


#13

Thanks for the feedback - You are correct the southern exposure isn’t street facing. I looked on GAF’s website and I like what I read about the Intake Booster – if I understand this correctly this would eliminate the need for adding the gable vents in the west and end of the house?

Can you explain more about your following comments?

  • then installing whatever soffit product you intend to use &
  • adding vents if you don’t use something like a Hardie continuous run ventilated soffit.

I am not sure I understand these as I do not have any soffits on the house. This is how I am interpreting your feedback – while getting new roof install GAF Cobra III ridge vents and install a least 2 of the intake boosters. From what I see on GAF literature is says “do NOT use on homes without soffit ventsâ€


#14

I would not use that product for 2 reasons.

  1. snow and rain will get sucked into the attic from this intake vent that should not be on the roof as an intake to begin with.

  2. All the dirt that will be sucked in.

Oh yea one onther thing. If it is in the back of the home it will not do any good for the front of the home. All it really is a power vent with the blade on backwards. Bad idea from gaf. I suggest either drip vent or smart vent. Not adding a power vent bad idea


#15

I wasn’t aware GAF states “…without a soffit vent…” & am unsure as to their reasoning. I’ll have to do some research on that issue.

Back to “build a soffit”. It’s raining here & I can afford to sit on the PC this wet Monday.

I will assume, lacking photos, that right now what you have is exposed rafters extended a couple’a feet over the side of the house with some form of decking on top. This is your eave.

Fascia, if you have it, is the vertical (or angled back towards the house & nearly vertical) 1 x 6 / 1 x 8 or 2 x 6 / 2 x 8 piece of wood that is nailed onto the face of these rafter tips (hence the word “fascia”). The idea here is to protect the rafter tip ends from sucking in moisture via the exposed grain ends. They’re like straws & will slurp up water & condensation all day long.

Sometimes @ the top edge of fascia you’ll have wooden drip edge. This was designed as a sacrificial & easily replaceable product to protect the fascia as well as something to give the shingle a rest & prevent drooping on the extended edge of the shingle. This wooden drip edge is also covered with metal drip edge for one last preventative option.

Back to the eave / soffit. If you do NOT have any siding or plywood going from the eave @ a nearly 90 degree angle to the wall, then you don’t have a fascia. You probably have a 2 x 4 or maybe a 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 blocking the spaces between your rafters. If you were to knock out this piece of blocking wood, you now get attic access to fresher, cooler air. You then need to have a horizontal piece of wood or sizing added from the inside of the eave to the wall. If it’s not ventilated, then there’s no real reason to add ridge vents to begin with.

I hope this all comes clearer & I answered your question.


#16

I will try to get pics posted soon


#17

Front of House (NorthSide)
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8469-1/NorthSide_1.jpg

Front of House (NorthSide)
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8472-1/NorthSide_2.jpg
On this picture from the chimney to the right is all attic and is the space that needs to be vented

Front of House (NorthSide)
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8474-2/NorthSide_3.jpg
This picture shows the only inlet vent on the house but it is actually blocked by walls and the dormer in the attic so it actually is useless


#18

East Side of House
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8477-1/EastSide.jpg

West Side of House
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8479-2/WestSide.jpg

South Side of House
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8482-1/SouthSide_1.jpg

South Side of House
http://www.roofersreview.com/d/8484-1/SouthSide_2.jpg