Need help finding reviews on materials


#1

I am trying to post again - I did so earlier but I guess nothing got posted.

I will simplify my questions this time.
I research and look for reviews for products and companies.
I live in Everett Washington (wet country). I have a 100 year old house with a detached garage.

I have had several contractors give me quotes. Some swear by certain products andmaterials used. Hear is what I have been told is good and also bad…

Pabco roofing material (30 year)
certainteed (30 year)
Owens corning (30 - 50 year)
Gaf/Elf (30-50 year)

ridge vents good
ridge vents bad
traditional vents good
ridge vents better than traditional and vice versa.

what is the opinion here???
ridge vents (I do have gable vents in the front and back of my house)
or traditional vents (mushrooms)

the look is ok either way - I am not hung up on things in my roof. I have plumbing on the outside of my house :?

Its not like my house is new, big or fancy. Its a 100 year old mill workers cottage.


#2

I roof in the seattle area…

Pabco makes a good inexpensive arc shingle. They are made locally (tacoma/portland)…so you will be helping out the NW economy

Certainteed is a little better product. Is your roofer selling the shingle itself or is he selling you that he is a certified master shingler for Cert. You will pay a higher premium if it is the latter.

As for vented ridge…They are better than regular vents and look nicer.

Negatives…ridge vents w/o baffles will have a reduced exhaust flow when one side has the wind blowing against it.

Ridge vents with baffles are a little better…they cancel out the wind direction issue, but can get clogged with debris over time (greatly reducing exaust flow)


#3

thank you for your thoughts.

I do like to support local economy anytime i can.

still not sure about the ridge vents over the mushrooms. I dont mind the way they look and I have other absticals in the roof that will still be there when its all said and done.


#4

Do you currently have a composition roof? (shingles)

If your attic is not overly hot when you compare the temp inside of the house to the attic space…then your probably venting ok.

“If it is not broken, don’t fix it!” I.E…keep the same number of vents and forget the vented ridge.


#5

I am way under vented.
when i bought the house 16 years ago the insulation was waist deep. R48 rating. Now its inches over the rafters. Its hot and we have terible heating issues year round. used to be pretty good when we moved in. so, well its broke. i think we have 3 mushrooms in a 1250 sqft house. none on the dormer and none on the hip roof in the back (west exposure).


#6

Well then 3 is not enough…you might need 6-7 vents. I think, though, that you would like the look of vented ridge.

Walk around your nieghborhood and look for houses recently roofed. Vented ridge is becoming most common around here…everyone is having it installed.


#7

do you have proper intake vents/soffit vents?


#8

in a word - “no”.

I do not have any sofit vents and the gable vents are ok but not really enough. Plus the existing mushrooms are not even near the top - more like the middle.


#9

Is your house 1-story?

Being only 1-story…one of those vents are most likely venting the kitchen stove, which leaves only 2 vents left for exhaust.

In a lot of cases those other two vents might be a bathroom exhaust…being as low as they are.

Regardless…If your attic space extends from those vents to the ridge line, you will need to cut addition vent holes near the ridge.

If there is a kitchen range, make sure it is replaced with an RVO-38 metal vent. An accidental kitchen fire will melt a plastic one and possibly cause more damage.


#10

Just another thought…your lower vents (if not being used) could be acting as your intake and the outtake will be your gable vents.

If you can…poke your head up into your attic access to check it out.


#11

The Pabco shingles I’ve seen used would not be what I described as “good”. Seems like a very high amount of the granules feel off in the packaging.


#12

**Authentic_dad…**The two most popular colors are the black and pewter grey. These colors are manufactured, trucked, sold, and installed very fast. Other colors are not sold as fast, hence, they sit in the yard longer.

Those shingles become more brittle and can loose a lot of granules at install time. Now what I have heard is that Pabco uses higher % of granules (compared to competitors) on thier 3-tab (when manufacturing), but not sure if they use more on the laminates.


#13

If it is not broke dont fix it.

Heres my run down Certainteed master applicator or not they will sell it at the price they need to stay in business. Ridge vents with baffles and blocked gable vents with the correct amount of open soffit vents i have not seen any problems with and have checked.

There is a thing called the 1/300 rule its used when the house has soffit vents example 1200 free attic space divided by 300 give you 4 times 144 to get to inches give you 576 inches dived that by 2 you will have 288 then you divide 56 for cans and 18.5 for baffled ridge vent so 6 vents or 16 feet of ridge to meet the minimum code requirements. there is a 1/150 rule thats used without soffits NO ridge vent then it will not work without intake. since 70+ percent of homes being not ventilated correctly or nailed properly that has brought the mother load of class action suits that the plaintiffs will never win since the roof was done wrong to begin with. So when in need i fix the problem i just dont do whats there and call it a day.


#14

sorry - was off line yesterday and am now getting a chance to explain more.

my house was built in 1910. I believe i have the original cedar shakes with 3 layers of 3 tab over it. the vents are just vents and i have gable vents on the east / west sides.

there are no soffit vents.

as for the bath - I had a fan added a couple of years ago and its routed through a duct to the back of the house - the electrician did not want to install a vent in the roof. the stove and such… I wish i had venting.

I am planning to have the old roof(s) removed and all new material installed. so new skip sheeting and up. I am getting all kinds of info from salesmen. but it all contradicts each other.

I just want to get it done right. and not spend more than my house is worth. it keeps going down in value every year lately.


#15

[quote=“nwmud”]my house was built in 1910. I believe i have the original cedar shakes with 3 layers of 3 tab over it. the vents are just vents and i have gable vents on the east / west sides.

there are no soffit vents.[/quote]

You don’t need to replace the skip sheathing, deck over it with plywood or osb, doesn’t really matter which.

You most likely need your ventilation fixed.
Rafter vents can be installed before the redeck, this is a good time to add insulation if you need it, if you haven’t already you probably need some insulation.
The rafter vents will provide clear airflow for the soffit vents or smartvent that needs to be installed also.

A cedar shake roof with a couple of layers of asphalt over them is an expensive roof to fix correctly.
They are usually steep and in my area at least the homes are close together making access difficult sometimes.

I have had good luck with Landmark shingles, no issues of any kind in 14 yrs of being in business.
Owens Corning Durations and Tamko Heritage are good shingles also.

Shinglevent II works well in my area, some other ridgevents let snow in the attic under certain circumstances.

I have found that the only I&W shield that truly works when you need it to is Grace, but if you don’t have ice damming issues it doesn’t really matter too much.

Your roof is what we in the business call a pig.
A good roofing crew can do wonderful things with it, some will just make it worse.


#16

My spelling is bad - but your point/issue/question?

I dont understand the last post?


#17

nwmud…I think gtp1003 was explaining how to figure out how many vents you may need for your house.

Axiom…Was just touching basis on a lot of different issues regarding your house and the headache that most likely will come with it once you get the project off the ground.

I will attempt to define some of those issues…

1 If you have cedar shingles as your 1st layer…you will have spaced sheathing(skip). You will have to install plywood to create a smooth surface for your new shingles.

  1. Rafter vents??? I never heard of them. Smart vent is a continuous low profife venting. It is placed at the eave and your 1ist course of shingles areinstalled over it (will give you intake venting)

  2. Shingle Vent II is one of the top vented ridge to use…should you choose to go with vent ridge.

  3. You live in Everett and I am near Seattle…You will not have ice dam issues.

  4. Your expence will be great because you have 3-4 layers on your house, you need to resheet, and possibly steep job.

You will need a good company to do this job. A smaller company may not have enough resources to takle the job and may take several days to a week to complet…or more.


#18

When I saw his post before only the quote from my precious post showed up (dial up). anyway my roof is a 8/12 pitch. and I do understand what needs to be replaced.

Today I was told by one company - my house is too far away for giving me a quote. go figure.


#19

Then your ahead of the game!

Some small companies will only serve a small region due to accesability of local materials. Too far away, they have to plan for contingencies and it becomes a hassle.

Some estimators will take a look at a house and keep going!


#20

[quote=“nwmud”]I am trying to post again - I did so earlier but I guess nothing got posted.

I will simplify my questions this time.
I research and look for reviews for products and companies.
I live in Everett Washington (wet country). I have a 100 year old house with a detached garage.

I have had several contractors give me quotes. Some swear by certain products and materials used. Hear is what I have been told is good and also bad…

Pabco roofing material (30 year)
certainteed (30 year)
Owens corning (30 - 50 year)
Gaf/Elf (30-50 year)

ridge vents good
ridge vents bad
traditional vents good
ridge vents better than traditional and vice versa.

what is the opinion here???
ridge vents (I do have gable vents in the front and back of my house)
or traditional vents (mushrooms)

the look is ok either way - I am not hung up on things in my roof. I have plumbing on the outside of my house :?

Its not like my house is new, big or fancy. Its a 100 year old mill workers cottage.[/quote]

Ventilation provides the conditions that allow air to flow out with hot air in with the cool air. Ventilation should never be an afterthought in constructing a home. Without proper ventilation, needless heat and humidity can become serious problems. Actually traditional venting is better than ridge vents. A ridge vent allows wind and elements to blow directly in through the ridge vent. Traditional vents are covered by metal plates or grates that are secured over the opening. Properly sealing around a vent can help ensure that no excess air escapes or penetrates the seams of the vent. After all, the purpose of the vent cover is to control airflow and distribution.