My Customer Is Looking For Claim Help


#1

I have a customer who is looking to make a claim for wind and hail damage. He wants me to help him by providing some documentation about the damage prepare a quote.

I know it’s in my best interest to get him to sign a contract before I provide such help; so he does not go with someone else or pocket the money.

Is it also advantageous to him? Does the adjuster have less influence if there is a contract (like an inappropriate referal to another company or demand of multiple quotes)?

Thanks for any input.


#2

If you already have a signed contract, then the insurance company is obligated to pay the replacement cost for like and similar materials requiring replacement.

They still usually say that this $$ is the maximum amount they will pay, but they should pay for the entire amount as long as you have a signed contract already.

If they try to get the HO to switchm then that is interference with a contract.

Ed


#3

The storm chasers here in MN make the home owners sign contracts and the salesmen meet with the adjuster and if it’s paid for by the insurance company the contractor does it for the insurance dollars or charge 30-50% of the insurance dollars if they decide to go with some body else or pocket the money.

Met with an adjuster today on a 40sq 8/12. The gutters and downspouts were paid but the roof was denied twice. When the home owner talked to the adjuster on the phone who denied the roof a month earlier said he was 95% sure he would be able to pay for the roof. By the time we met at the house the adjuster had already marked off the three spots and circles were spotted from the ground.

As soon as I pulled up the adjuster came down off the roof and shook my hand and we exchanged names and numbers. When the home owner asked, “Is my roof going to be covered?” I heard the strangest thing to come from an adjusters mouth, (who previously said not one hail dent had damaged the roof), “Yes, I’m going to put in for a roof replacement but again I couldn’t find any hail damage”. After walking off the roof 14 hits could be found on the ridge (250ft) but due to the manufacturer issues with the New Horizons it was hard to see hail damage on the shingles.

Who knows why or how it happened. Perhaps the insurance company figured they didn’t want to fight anymore or they had an extra roof to pay for.


#4

Dougger,

Are you saying that these guys still get 30% to 50% if they do not even do the job?

I want a copy of that agreement form and I don’t even get many hail claims around me.

Ed


#5

They pay for a lot roofs around here that have no damage. Other times they are shifting money involved in the settlement away from the roof to other things that aren’t damaged.
Go figure


#6

I’d charge him for a full, written roof inspection with detailed pictures. Then tell him you will take whatever the charge is off your bill if you end up getting the roof replacement. Nothing for nothing IMO, my time is not free.


#7

Here’s what I do, and we have been blessed with 2 MAJOR hail storms in 3 years with over 2000 jobs:

Talk with the customer and explain to him/her that you are extremely familiar with how the claims process works. Explain that by “authorizing” this contract, they are giving you permission to represent them or “go to bat” for them in regards to the insurance company. They are not giving you any money yet, but by authorizing that contract, they have selected you as the contractor. Next have them submit a copy of your contract to their insurance company. Now as long as the insurance company does agree that there is hail damage, and they have that signed contract…most of the time the check they give the customer will have the customers name, your name, and sometimes the mortgage company’s name. So at this point they can’t even cash that check until you sign it…its YOUR roof now.

Keep in mind that if you’re sure there is hail damage, then you have nothing to worry about…they’re gonna get the money, and you are going to have a satisfied customer because everything you said would happen, DID happen.


#8

30% to 50% I think some one needs to check those figures. It’s more like 10 to 15% of the amount to replace the roof.

But please keep in mind the right to cancel only applies to door to door sales. If you were called by the home owner and asked to come to thier home and they sign your argreement they have NO right to cancel.


#9

Ridge Walker,

I have read reference to your statement, but that does not transcend the Federal 3 day right to rescind law and possible various local or state versions.

Also, it is illegal to “Spike” the 3-day process by putting in a date earlier than the actual date you sign the agreement.

I find this law to be be ludicrous when the customer initiated contact with you in the first place.

Ed


#10

Some local and State laws will be differant but the FTC ruling only allows for the cooling off period should a home owner choose to do business with some one who knocked on thier door asking for unsolicited business.


#11

[quote=“RidgeWalker”]30% to 50% I think some one needs to check those figures. It’s more like 10 to 15% of the amount to replace the roof.

But please keep in mind the right to cancel only applies to door to door sales. If you were called by the home owner and asked to come to thier home and they sign your argreement they have NO right to cancel.[/quote]

I’ve heard numerous home owners use those numbers. It seems most say 30% of the insurance dollars is what the contractor is entitled to if the home owner either has some one else do the work, themselves, or if they pocket the money.

Yes, 30%-50% is by the storm chasers who of course come to the home owner. Keep in mind most won’t even measure the roof!!! They usually just go off the insurance numbers.

Have yet to see one of the contracts and really don’t care to, by business is run the old fashion way, a good old handshake.

Done a number of roofs without even meeting the home owner, just phone calls. Did three tear offs for one home owner and finally met him in person after I finished the third roof, he moved three states away so I’ll no longer be doing his roofs I guess!