Moisture in SPF Roof - Breckenridge


#1

The Condo Board of our Breck condo Home Owners Association decided about 4 years ago to replace the ballasted BUR with a Foam spray on. While the decision was probably a decent one at the time (for all of the benefits of a SPF roof), we just completed an exterior renovation of the rest of the architectural components (decks, windows, stucco, small roofs over decks & bumpouts, etc) and now have TONS of roof leaks. The sub-contractors scampered all over the roof with absolutely no regard to the SPF and now we have numerous punctures in the top coat allowing melting snow and rain to penetrate into the foam. Homeowners on the top floor are having quite a few leaks bad leaks into their units.

On to my questions…

  1. Once moisture saturates areas of foam, is there a way to get the moisture out prior to attempting to re-coat the top of the SPF? Or, does it have to be cut out and re-sprayed?

  2. If the saturated sections comprise much of the roof, would it be better to re-roof?

  3. Is there anything that can be done in the short term to get us through the winter since SPF requires warmer temperatures to re-do? The leaks are keeping home-owners from using their units during prime ski season. (We would have to do some snow removal prior to any intervention!!)

  4. I’ve seen mentioned on this forum a few other top coats for SPF (silicone, etc)…what would be advised topcoat in a location such as the mountains of Colorado for a roof that is succeptable to some maintenance walking traffic as well as bird pecks, etc. going forward?

Thanks so much to the professionals on this forum.


#2

I would try to track a gentleman named Tom Hay down
and discuss the technical aspects of the repair issues, and possibly, a source for the product/ tools necessary. If the moisture is leaking thru, I would think that once the leak is stopped, the leak will eventually seep thru, and your good to go…Of course,
if your dealing with a ponded roof between the BUR and the foam…or the BUR and the rigid insulation system, then additional work would be necessary. Might be a good time to barter some work for some ski vacation time…I will mention this request to him in another place that I know he hangs around and have him read this thread.

Good luck…,. hope this helps

David


#3
  1. If the foam roof is holding moisture the chances are the foam was off ratio when applied and will need to be removed.
  2. If the most of the roof is saturated it will need to be tore off.
  3. Caulking or black roof cement will be your best bet to stop leaks for the winter.
  4. The existing foam roof can be scarified (which tears off the top layer of foam and coating) and wet foam should be removed completely- the dry foam can be re sprayed and re coated.
    Your best bet is to check your warranty and see if the MFG. will help you but it sounds like the foam was not applied properly.

#4

Contact the Contractors and get their liability insurance to take care of the problems caused by them, working and neglecting the roof surface.

Ed


#5

[quote=“Krakkerjak”]1. If the foam roof is holding moisture the chances are the foam was off ratio when applied and will need to be removed.
2. If the most of the roof is saturated it will need to be tore off.
3. Caulking or black roof cement will be your best bet to stop leaks for the winter.
4. The existing foam roof can be scarified (which tears off the top layer of foam and coating) and wet foam should be removed completely- the dry foam can be re sprayed and re coated.
Your best bet is to check your warranty and see if the MFG. will help you but it sounds like the foam was not applied properly.[/quote]

Off ratio foam will be either crispy or soupy. It will not be real foam. I am sure if it was off ratio foam, there would have been issues well before the renovations.

Closed cell roofing foam does not absorb water. Did someone tell you that the foam was absorbing water?

Was the previous roof removed prior to installation of the new foam roofing system? I ask this because a foam roof applied directly to the roof deck, the likelihood of this roof leaking, even with substantial surface damamge would be nearly nonexistent. You would have to damage the foam all the way through the thickness and down to the deck itself. Depending on the type of deck, even damage down to said deck could go for a very long time without ever leaking. Punctures in the topcoat will usually not lead to leaks in a properly applied SPF roof.

If the existing roof was not removed prior to installation of the SPF roof, then dropping of heavy tools/equipment/materials, etc that penetrates the foam, previous roof, then into the underlying layers would probably result in roof leaks like any other system. This is an important question to be answered.

Tom wondered if there were penetrations added to the roof during any of the construction. Good question.

Roof cement is NOT a suitable repair for SPF. Urethane or polyurea caulk will usually do the job.

If the roof was working until the damages occurred, then this would probably not be a manufacturer problem.

I asked Tom if I could post his reply in full and am waiting on a response. [/code]

Nearly ALL of this came from Tom.


#6

From my good friend, Tom Hay:

*Hokay. My first question back would be did they tear off the old BUR and go right to deck. The reason for that question is even if the coating and foam are punctured the chances of it leaking through the BUR in same spot is highly unlikely.

Number 2 is not real. If they used 3 LB Closed cell Foam it will not absorb water other then perhaps 6" due to UV degragation breaking closed cells.

Number 3. Sure you can apply a Urethane or Polyurea caulk, I don’t care if it’s 50 below zero…

Number 4. Without seeing it I do not reccomend Polurea as it is a vapor barrier. I would apply a like coating, broadcast silica while wet and another coat over after excess silica removal. If they didn’t want to do the whole roof do a walk way area as stated above and tint the top coat yellow.

I don’t know why they even posted the questions. The people that damaged the roof are responsible. @ 4 years the roof should still be under warranty and the companies that damaged it should pay contractor holding warranty to repair it. If an AC contractor played Mumbly peg on your Single ply would that not be how it would be handled?

If this is a real deal I bet they put protrusions through the roof and left or used Plastic Roof Cement*.


#7

I was merely stating the obvious- without looking at the roof these were just guesses-and although black cement is not a good way to fix the leaks it will get you through emergnecies. There are many variables that could be causing these troubles- I merely stated the most obvious as I have been applying foam roof systems since the 70’s. 98% of ALL ROOF failures are due to poor appliciation- no matter what type of system. It’s a sad statemnet but unfortunalty true- again I would check with the MFG. and see if they can help out.


#8

hello largeone,
my mom lives in montrose,
well im from florida, but if i was thrown into the
situation, i would create some kind of tent over roof to get it dryed out or close to it. and i would coat area leaking with kool seal and run heaters on it to dry it. i do know if you get water inbetween foam and old roof it needs to be dug out and refoamed.

i do know people at G.E solutions / tarheel roofing.
guys name is john irwin.
call him at 727-823-3455.

good luck.