Missing the nail line


#1

just had an overlay done. i was on the roof a few times as my roofer was working and it seemed like he was missing the nail line an awful lot. i didnt say anything because i felt he had an attitude and would screw things up even more if i did. is my roof bound for troubles ?
also, the shingles from the first roof were installed at least a half inch beyond the drip edge. he did not trim that back but put the new L shaped drip edge over that. now i have less gutter clearence, can just about get my hand in to clean them. not very happy at all.


#2

Well the 1/2 inch past the drip is normal. That is the correct way of doing it. This stops water wicking up the roof and helps run off into the gutter.

Missing the nail line tho is not a good thing. Blow off’s can happen and the bottom of the shingle can fall out if you bought laminates. Bad instalation if you ask me. Can you have problems yes. How high above the line did he or she go? If over an inch thats not good if even more than that ask for the salesperson to come out and show them. That is not correct and see what they will do for you. I doubt they will tear it off and redo it. I would just call the office and see if you can get someone out there. Hope you have pics of this or you will be out of luck. Tearing up the shingles would nto be advisable.


#3

Hi,

Yes, if he was going to install new edge metal over the shingles, he should have cut the shingles back.

You are going to have problems sooner or later. Where you live will make a difference in how soon the problems show up.

How did you know the shingles were good enough to put another layer on?


#4

are you in a setting that is prone to high winds…ex: next to an open field or water front. if yes… you are a prime candidate for blow offs. it also depends how much higher than the line did he nail. what brand of shingles did you use. some brands have a more tolerant nail area.


#5

IMO, you were bound for doom & destruction from the start by doing a layover.

Did they use a vapor barrier between the two layers?

On the new layer, did the installer cut back the headlap on the first course & double nail?

Did they use the right sized nails (i.e. long enough to penetrate BOTH layers & extend through the roof deck to a visible length)?

Above & beyond these questions, a layover can result in sagging deck between rafters, additional moisture being trapped in the attic & the roof retaining heat a lot longer through the night after the sun sets & overall, a shorter lifespan for the top layer of shingles.

If you intend to sell your house in, say, 10 years & you have 3 tab shingles, the new owner will then have the problem of [having to pay for a removal of & management of any resultant issues as a result of] 2 layers within the time span of THEIR ownership, provided they have the house for ~5 years or so.

If I were you, I’d keep your insurance up to date & pray for a hail storm. It’s your best hope.

Oh, & if you have AllState, switch.


#6

Ranchhand, although you make some valid pooints, I have never read any manufacturer specs requiring a “vapor barrier” in between 2 layers of shingles. I’ve also seen nailovers, when properly reflashed and ventilated, last just as long if not longer than the original roof. I disagree that the homeowner is doomed from the start with a nailover.


#7

Hi,

I agree. I do tear-offs myself. There are roofs that I would do a layover if the customer asked.

I would never use a vapor barrier. Water vapor will travel through felt and shingles. To add a layer of felt for the water vapor to condense on is a problem looking for a place to happen.

If would also make for a losy looking roof.

I have seen them outlast the warranty too.


#8

owens corning - oakridge pro 30yr shingle used. my roofer was actually missing the nail line on the low side about a half inch. the shingles have sealed now after the hot weather. it looks good but i just wish i could have found a more concientious roofer. but i dont think i’ll pray for a hail storm as one of that magnitude would damage much more than my roof. thanks for all your input.


#9

Would it be wise to caulk any exposed nail heads with something like Geocell?


#10

Hi,

Yes seal them.


#11

new edge metal over old.
i do that.
less gutter opening.
yeah your rite.

your problem is going to be the high nails.
hope your not in a high wind zone.

leave it and hope for the best.

good luck.

gweedo.


#12

The nails may not be showing. He may have butted the new metric shingles up to 5" exposed 3 tabs


#13

[quote=“beyondiceman”]just had an overlay done. i was on the roof a few times as my roofer was working and it seemed like he was missing the nail line an awful lot. i didnt say anything because i felt he had an attitude and would screw things up even more if i did. is my roof bound for troubles ?
also, the shingles from the first roof were installed at least a half inch beyond the drip edge. he did not trim that back but put the new L shaped drip edge over that. now i have less gutter clearence, can just about get my hand in to clean them. not very happy at all.]

By not nailing on the nail line voids the warranty of the shingle. As for the bottom edge, it should have been cut back flush with eaves before the gutter apron was put on. As for the vapor barrier between the layers it is not necessary, never used the barrier and I have been roofing for 20 years and never been called back for a leak.[/quote]


#14

With any drip edge you MUST have some type of overhang. Normally with L style is 1/2 and with t style 1/4 either way it CANNOT be flush with the eaves.


#15

i run em flush all the time.

i know, i know,
i aint rite.

gweedo


#16

99% of roofs in my region (including my own) are flush at the drip and rake (we use drip for rake). i have never seen or heard of a problem from this. but, as we have discovered from this site (time & time again) roofing is very different by regions.


#17

Hi,

I am flush on the rake. The drip edge keeps any water from going sideways.

Hang over 3/4" at the eaves. If not we run into problems with the gutter.


#18

If it’s on a flat pitch it won’t be that serious. I hope he used atleast a 1 1/2" nail. If its on a 9/12 or higher the shingles will prolly melt apart on architech. I’ve seen it alot where old roofs were nailed high and the bottom layer of the shingle starts melting done the roof, when i pulled up some to repair They were nailed like 6 nails 3" down from top. Lazy &*&%%$'s. I may charge cheap, and may be a little slower than some roofer’s. But I take pride in my work and try to do the very best job I can for a person.


#19

melt apart.
first time ive heard it called that.

nice to meet you hatchet.

are you working on the damaged coast?

gweedo


#20

I’m working around the Jackson, MS area. I’ve been reduced to remodeling jobs, painting, sheetrock repair, ceramic tile (i kinda enjoy that), stuff like that. Roofing is slow round here. But it’s what I like doing the most.