Missing Asphalt on New Shingles


#1

so…I’ve already reached out to the roofer and awaiting his callback.
Full tearoff, new shingles. A small piece of shingle was found after a rainstorm so I decided to climb up on check. Never did notice this in spring, when the job was gone but there are a couple of shingles that have areas that are missing granules and it’s pure black. I suppose it was due to their ladders leaning on them.

Easy proper fix for a roofer though ?


#2

Pictures would be helpful. If the shingles are actually damaged or defective, replacing the few bad shingles would be an easy solution.


#3

Yes its an easy fix. But honestly, how long do you plan to keep hanging out on your roof looking for defects? Excessive foot traffic is a big cause of missing granuals.


#4

I actually took all my ladders away for storage. Did not warrant a checkup till I saw a piece of shingle on the floor.


#5

Roofer came out about 2 weeks ago. Advised he did not want to rip and replace the damaged shingles due to how each row is overlapping and layered…(I’m no roofer so shed some insight). He’s planning to come back and just ~glue~ some asphalt onto the bare areas…

I wish this job as as seamless as the mechanicals guys I hired to uninstall and reinstall all my HVAC.

Looks like ~some~ debris has found it’s way into my leader pipe during the tearoff as over time, leading up to now, water has been accumulating in the leader and had finally shown there is a clog somewhere keeping standing water in the pipe


#6

Granules are embedded in the asphalt, not “glued.” The only true way to embed granules in a shingle is to possibly heat the shingle to a near-melting point and embed new granules. I DO NOT recommend doing that- this was merely to prove a point.

If the granules are missing, you can expect degregation of the asphalt to the fiberglass mat much faster than the remaining heathy shingles. If this was my own roof and these are fairly significant spots, I would have them replaced.

If you can, disconnect the bottom section of the downspout and work with a shop vac. May be your best hope at an easy fix.


#7

Thank you TN

What entails a proper repair.
The way he made it sound, it was far better to follow his guidance on just putting asphalt back on instead of ~remove/replace~ as just due to how shingles are laid and interlocked


#8

Removing and replacing shingles is really simple and is a basic shingling skill that any residential roofer can do.


#9

I just googled shingle replace and repair. You’re right. It does seem straightforward and not ~invasive~ to the top shingle, it which the installer inferred that it would be, just due to how he said they are installed.


#10

Just let him glue some granules on any bare spots.
Its really not that big of a deal.

If he isnt a well seasoned shingle repair man,
Than he could cause more damage.
Be at peace, brother, please!!


#11

Nope, Have him replace the damaged shingles. Don’t allow him to sugar coat the problematic shingles with glue and granules.