Low-slope roof and leaky ridge vent


#1

i saw a similar post by someone else in illinois, but i have slightly different issues, so bear with me…

we have an approx. 2:12 roof on our 1957 ranch home – very simple, no weird gables, no big chimney, no problems with ice dams. it has a modified bitumen roof, which was installed by the previous owners about 2.5 years ago. it’s in great shape, by all accounts. it is ventilated by (nearly) continuous soffit vents on our very wide eaves, and an aluminum ridge vent along the center.

on the inside, almost all of our ceilings are vaulted/cathedral – except for a small, 3’ x 20’ area that runs down the center of the house, about half the length of the structure. this area is hallway and closets, and has a drop ceiling. we’ve noticed some water staining on the ceiling, and we hear some dripping above when it rains. there is no access to this area, which is probably only 2-3 tall at the center.

i’m pretty convinced the source of the water is our ridge vent, and i’ve been up there a few times to make sure everything looks okay – no blockages, no bent metal, making sure the edges are sealed, etc. but the water keeps coming in, drip by painful drip. i’ve gotten some advice to get rid of the ridge vent altogether, and maybe put in some kind of mechanical ventilation – but we don’t have the money to do a major roofing project.

so, my question is whether we should maybe try just to replace the aluminum ridge vent with something more effective (like the gaf snow country or something)… or if our only hope is just to roof over… or if there is something more we can do to mitigate the problem. i have also not looked in the “attic” space to see if there is anything obvious to be learned from up there – i am mostly just scared to see what i’ll find (moldy insulation?). but if i do that, is there something else i can check for?


#2

so, my question is whether we should maybe try just to replace the aluminum ridge vent with something more effective (like the gaf snow country or something)…

As long as your roof already has functioning soffit vent, etc. I would first make an attempt to switch out your open ridge vent with one that uses a baffle system like GAF Snow Country. If that fails you can either close off the ridge entirely or build some kind of custom curbed ridge vent system, which frankly will probably look like hell. I’m sure someone will be along shortly to scream how you should vent every roof, yada-yada… Maybe they will be kind enough to design your new vent system and fax you the specs. Venting a low slope ridge is always problematic.


#3

Are you the same poster who put a similar post with diagrams on www.DIYchatroom.com

I will be back later on to read through all of your information. I have to think about your options to your scenario.

Ed


#4

yes, i think that’s me…


#5

GAF snow country would be my suggestion. as long as your cut is not too big.


#6

i just dont like ridge vents on a low slope.
hell i dont like em on any slope.

do somethin else.

gweedo