Leak Barrier & Drip Edge on Eaves?


#1

Great Site!

I am getting estimates on 31 square GAF Timberline 30 and removing 2 layers of old roofing. I am also getting about 18 sheets of new decking with some sistering of existing 2 x 8s due to crowning/flattness issues. All contractor prices are about $10,000. A few of the contractors don’t use leak barrier on the eaves or drip edges. In live in South East PA. The guys that use the barrier and drip edge have reason for doing so but so do the guys saying it’s not necessary. What’s the real deal?

Help…


#2

Hi,

What do you mean by “eaves or drip edges”?

If they are all about the same use the ones that will install the leak barrier.

In Pa. we have ice dams. This will limit the damage from them. Your local building code probably requires it. Thou there is probably no inspection, some will not install it.


#3

Gaf says to install the weatherwatch as they call it on all eaves and dripedges. Truth is, IMO you do not need it there. In all honesty, I sort of think I+W is pointless. I mean, they went plenty of years without it being around and not having problems to all of a sudden its all people want. (I had a guy insist on wanting 9 feet of I+W around the whole house but I told him how horrible of an idea it really is and he did not want to hear it and said he would find someone who would do it). I can see using it in problem areas like valleys and around chimneys and such but I tend to believe the companies just want you to spend more money. I do however install it on all rake edges and valleys. I live in Wisconsin and have never had leak problems without it being on the edges.

Just go with what you feel more comfortable with. IMO, I believe either way will truly make no difference. (except price)

Take Care


#4

[quote=“BAMBAMM5144”]Gaf says to install the weatherwatch as they call it on all eaves and dripedges. Truth is, IMO you do not need it there. In all honesty, I sort of think I+W is pointless. I mean, they went plenty of years without it being around and not having problems to all of a sudden its all people want. (I had a guy insist on wanting 9 feet of I+W around the whole house but I told him how horrible of an idea it really is and he did not want to hear it and said he would find someone who would do it). I can see using it in problem areas like valleys and around chimneys and such but I tend to believe the companies just want you to spend more money. I do however install it on all rake edges and valleys. I live in Wisconsin and have never had leak problems without it being on the edges.

Just go with what you feel more comfortable with. IMO, I believe either way will truly make no difference. (except price)

Take Care[/quote]

you have never had a call for a leaking ice dam…or seen rotted wood at the eves when you tear off?


#5

Hi,

I know one thing is for sure this is going to cost homeowners a fortune when we go to reroof all these roofs with leak barrier on.

We will have to replace all the plywood that this stuff is on.


#6

h20guy,
if lefty or one of the other members is close, you should have him look at it.
youll be hard pressed to find better roofers.

gweedo


#7

I think Lefty is up near Catasauqua PA. It’s about 1 1/2 hours from me.

I wish I could get a straight answer from my township on the code for the barrier. The contractor I like best does not feel it is necessary to use the barrier or to install drip edging. Maybe I’ll wait until the old roof is ripped of and inspect it then. The house is 30 years old, if signs of dam damage exist I’ll ask him to add the barrier.

What about the drip edge at the eaves? Is it required? He states to just let the shingle overhang 3/4" and they’ll eventually bend over a bit essentially eliminating and capillary/wicking activity.

What do you think?


#8

Go to the building department.

Have them open up their code book to the roofing section and have them make a copy for you of those several pages.

Then you will know what is required for sure, in YOUR area.

I would be pretty certain that your territory would require Ice and Water Shield along the gutter eave edges, to go at least past the exterior wall and sometimes codes require it to go past by at least 24"

Ed


#9

Hello,

If the I & W is required by your building codes and you don’t install it that could come back to bite you if you wanted to sell the house. You would have to bring the house up to code. That would mean removing the first 6 to 8 feet of shingles and installing the I & W. It would kind of suck to do that on a couple year old roof when you can just have it done now.
Most contractors will work with you on what you want. Ask the one you like to install it. All he can say is no then you move to the next one.

Keith


#10

Marshall, yes I have had a call for that. This last winter we had HUGE problems with ice dams. I have of course seen rotted wood along the eaves but its a few houses here and their. The only houses last winter without ice dams were the ones we did. It has a lot more to deal with proper venting than ice and water. Everyone with icedams I showed a picture of my house to where there was still a foot of snow and no ice on it. I tend to believe that with the proper amount of soffit ventilation and ridge ventilation the amount of ice will be minimal. I am sure you know how the ice actually forms on the roof so think about if you keep the attic roughly the same temperature as it is outside, how much snow will melt from the underside and then refreeze in order to cause those ice dams?


#11

Most ice dams are gutters clogged some are real thaw than freeze but they should get it corrected with an energy audit. Thing I hate. Most about iceguard is when you install it in the. Heat and it gets scuffed because later it’ll stick to the shingles and you won’t ever get the iceguard off. You. Might end having to tear off all the wood 20 yrs from now but nobody ever discloses this


#12

BAMM…im not disagreeing with what you are saying, but…every house is different. Say you roof a house that was built 100 years ago. You address the ventilation and everything is hunky dory. In 5 years they have the house resided…new windows and so on. Now the house is much more “air tight”. They get alot less heat loss through the walls and windows and so on. Now you have more hot air getting into the attic. Wouldn’t you just rather play it safe? Just my theory.


#13

Yeah Marshall I am with you on that one. I do play it safe and thats why I use it. Glad we agree on that one. I just think that the manufacturer wants you to go overboard with it.


#14

i agree 100%

ice & water at eves, valleys and penetrations.

they want rakes, hips, ridges

“try 6’” they say

“try the whole roof” they say

gee arent they biased.

If it was that way in the real world (which we live in) we would tell home owners to replace their roof every 6 months, because its the safe thing to do.

thats it…im gonna become a manufactrue of the worlds first 6 month shingle (well maybe 2nd…IKO :wink: )


#15

that is hilarious. comes with a “90-90 warranty”. 90 seconds or 90 feet. or the extended “taillight warranty”


#16

[quote=“gweedo”]h20guy,
if lefty or one of the other members is close, you should have him look at it.
youll be hard pressed to find better roofers.

gweedo[/quote]

You are the best in Tampa Bay gweedo. Survey says.
And past customers.


#17

not sure if your near pittsburgh i foreman’d more roofs than any one in pgh besides the guys from hood roofing in the east… At least thats what i’ve heard from allied i have the slips too hehe… i think dripedge is good if you make it at the eaves i don’t think its really anything special at the rakes i usually put a 1/2" out on my fascia i think it looks better and usually the drip they sell isn’t really that good of quality… most gutters are pitch’d too so a custom dripedge to the top of the gutter hangers is the best…my bend them on a tapco pro 14 with the bottom hemmed then i roll the front like regular drip, but you get 3/4" past the eave because PRO brakes can’t go any closer since they have a 3/4" lip if you get me… drip edge really doesn’t do anything on steep roofs… but it won’t hurt so if you want it…i don’t think ice guard does much for ice dams personally the nails condensate over years the holes get larger and they leak my opinion… however if you have long rakes with valleys ice guard is cool if by some chance it washes past the selvage edge of your valley…these are just my theories and i’ve just noticed certain things from ripping so many roofs off and doing alot of service calls…i really believe alot of the code comes about because the manufacturers pay politicians and officials to force ppl to buy their products… because all the newer shingles are of some of the worst quality i’ve ever seen … i don’t mean to upset anyone either this is just my take… if your gutters are right and your installation is done right (ventilation, all new flashings) roofs work… take away any one of these factors and its wrong and it won’t last… most crappy jobs last for awile because older houses are steep you pull funny stuff on a 4-6:12 and it won’t last