Laying out closed cut valley


#1

I have two gable structures with a walkway between them. I’m trying to lay out control lines and need some help. All of the literature I have read shows them snapping lines parallel to the valley and running the shingles for the valley first. I have been starting my courses from the rake ends. How do you guys match the shingles up?

Do you layout the valley and then start laying shingles at the rake? You would then just trim the shingles when you hit the valley shingles.

Or

Do you lay out the valley and start shingling from there headed towards the rake?

Or

Do you shingle from the rake and just shingle over the valley with the manufacturer’s offset?

I’m using architectural shingles with a 6 1/2in offset.

Thanks


#2

When working a valley I lay 2 shingle side by side at a time. For some reason if I try and go up the valley by laying the valley shingle first the shingle end up being slightly cocked. So I lay the shingle adjacent first so I know it’s straight, then I butt my valley shingle to it. In this manner you run up the valley in aprox a 45 degree angle. Depending on you valley you will probably have to “jump back” your seam every so often as it will drift in too close to the valley.

“Do you layout the valley and then start laying shingles at the rake? You would then just trim the shingles when you hit the valley shingles.”

Sooo run up the valley 2 by 2 (like Noah) in aprox a 45 degree angle. Then as your seam between your 2 shingles starts to drift into your valley too much, slide your next 2 shingles back out of the valley a bit (much like a typewriter) so they are the aprox distance into the valley as the very first 2 shingles you laid. Rinse, repeat.

It’s easier and faster to cut a rake so I start in the valley. The exception are shingles that need to be laid out straight up the roof like 3-tabs. In that case I go up the rake but I will run 2 shingles at a time up the rake in the same method I use to run up a valley. IMO it just keeps them straighter.

“Do you shingle from the rake and just shingle over the valley with the manufacturer’s offset?”

No. FYI the manufacturers offset is in most cases a guideline. I don’t pull out my tape measure to get exactly 6-1/2" every shingle I just go by eye and shoot for 6-8" offset, which is plenty. Architectural shingles are very forgiving.

.


#3

Let me see if I am understanding this correctly. You run your normal courses up to the valley first. Then you trim the piece that goes between your valley shingles and normal course shingles. Is this correct?


#4

“Let me see if I am understanding this correctly. You run your normal courses up to the valley first. Then you trim the piece that goes between your valley shingles and normal course shingles. Is this correct?”

No.

This guy has way too many marks on the roof, looks like the landing strip for the Nimitz, lol. But his pictures are good. Just pop all your lines on the deck you’re working on first from eave to ridge before you begin the valley (you said 11"s right?) and copy what he’s doing in the pic. The main thing I do different is lay the valley in 2 shingle at a time instead of 1 at a time as this guy does. Don’t worry too much about all his crazy markings.

images.google.com/imgres?imgurl= … safe%3Doff


#5

Do you space your nails 6 inches away from the center of the valley or is it better to go even further. Maybe 8"


#6

keeping your nails out of the vally is good roofing practice. its also good to cut your vally with an old pair of tin snipd “shears” a little wd-40 sprayed on your snips and it will cut like butter.

RooferJim


#7

I try and stay aprox a foot out of the valley, nailing wise.

I use WD-40 to remove tar, just like gasoline. Use it around asphalt at your own risk.


#8

Thanks for that link. He made a mark 2 feet from the valley center line at the top corner of the shingle unexposed area. This would leave a 1 foot overlap measured at the top of the unexposed shingle. Is this an efficient overlap?


#9

Do you space for nails from the center of the valley must 12in.


#10

“leave a 1 foot overlap measured at the top of the unexposed shingle. Is this an efficient overlap?”

Sure. I would start my first shingle at around that measurement but keep in mind that as you go up the valley your seam will drift in deeper every row until you’re going to have to step it back like a carrige retun on a typewriter. His 2’ guideline is going to be for crap on most pitches because if you have to set the next offset by 6-8" then…

offset+roofpitch = guidelineisuseless.

Just run the aprox offset the menufacturer asks for and step a shingle back when your seam drifts into the valley too much. Pop whatever lines you are comfortable with being a beginner and all but there is no need for all the stuff that guy had going on in the link.


#11

I think I’m doing something wrong here. I installed a starter strip roll that is what you see at the bottom of the cut above the metal. The valley was going well until I cut the first shingle and saw this gap. I did a 2in offset from the center like the manufacture said to.

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x191/mtchophouse/valley.jpg
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x191/mtchophouse/valley2.jpg
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x191/mtchophouse/valley3.jpg


#12

When I said “offset” I meant the 6-8" you need to keep the shingle seams offset from each other going up the roof. I don’r cut my valleys off center because as I stated, I feel it’s a waste of time and it looks like hell. You’d need to ask these other guys around here that cut off center valleys how to run the first shingle to avoid that gap. I’d guess a weave hurl.


#13

Should I just cut along the seems? Does anyone here cut an offset in their closed cut valleys?


#14

those shingles u have layed up the valley are u intending to lay over them again


#15

I really didn’t understand the question. I am going to rip those out because of possible fungus problems. I will lay down a similar set though. These shingles are the ones that go underneath the valley. The ones on the bottom of the picture lay over the valley and get cut.


#16

then why dont u just lay over then and use a straight edge to cut them to the line it aint hard