Lab for testing shingles for hail damage


#1

Has anyone out there ever heard of a lab that will test shingles (uv imaging) for hail damage? A property manager was telling me about a storm chaser who promised to send off a few shingles to a lab who could somehow be able to test the shingles via uv light that could show areas affected by hail strikes, shining the light through the shingles where the damage had occured?


#2

There is a desaturation test that can be done on a shingle.Taken from AAA Technologies and its much more than shining a uv light at the material.If that were so every roofer on the planet would have an ultraviolet lamp chasing adjusters around with a suspected hail damaged shingle.

Desaturation is the removal of all asphalt, granules, saturant, filler, backcoating, sealant, and sizing from a roof sample. The sample is selected as being representative of a “hail damage” shingle. After desaturation, only the base glass felt remains – if it shows broken glass fibers or open areas in the felt, then the industry considers the normal life expectancy of the shingles to be reduced. When this condition is present, the roof is considered to be hail damaged.


#3

This is very useful info Roofmaster417. :slight_smile:


#4

I wonder how the desaturation of the shingle can determine if the hail damage is hail damage and not for example a tool mark, installation mark or say caused by golf ball in a sock or any other non hail damage. I also wonder how it could determine if it is old damage or new damage. If it occurred over multiple storms in the same year.
I don’t see any value in the desaturation of a shingle to determine “hail” damage from a single event.


#5

When a claim for storm damage is filed,whether it be wind or hail the insurer knows the date,size of hail and location or wind speeds a.k.a wind reports.Technology has been greatly improved when it comes hail strikes on a roof system and the effects there of.The testing labs know the effects of a hail stones size,shape and density.The ol’ golf ball in a sock routine is easily spotted as intentional damage.

To have a desaturation test performed on a roofing material suggests that the damage is questionable.Generally when these damage by “Strikes” are filed it has been some time since a storm has rolled through the area or the adjuster insists there isn’t enough damage or collateral damage to warrant a full roof replacement.

However a reinspect typically will do the trick if there is legitimate damage.But if the 2nd adjuster turns it down as well the next step for the homeowner or contractor is a desaturation test.

I have seen circular strikes from baseballs and softballs but golf balls do different type of visual damage that’s not a complete circular strike as say like a golf ball in a sock.

Once again if a desaturation test is performed its because either the adjuster(s) don’t believe there is enough damage for a full roof replacement.Several scenarios come into play when a desaturation test is issued.Prime example is Joe homeowner files a claim for storm damage,but Joe is a new policy holder and the insurer believes the damage was caused by a storm that’s prior to the date of coverage.


#6

Desat tests are the biggest farce in the insurance game. Asphalt based roofing materials or systems sustain Damage from point force impact in many more ways than simply tearing felts or skrim. I’ll give you an example…in a built up roof, what is the purpose of the asphalt? What is the purpose of the ply? The asphalt is the waterproofing agent in the system. The plies are there to provide tensile strength. If an ‘expert’ performs a desat test to determine whether a hail strike fractured or tore a ply, they have destroyed all of the evidence of the primary source of impact damage…innerply fracturing or crushing. If the impact fractures the asphalt anywhere in the innerply, moisture will wick into those areas. When that moisture freezes, it expands during phase change thus making the fissure or fracture larger. This process continues through subsequent freeze/thaw cycles. In addition, minute amounts of moisture that are allowed to enter the roof system will expand to some 1800 times their original size as the moisture changes phase to gas under the extreme heat and pressure inside the system. This is how roof blisters are formed. I have never lost a case where the opposing expert hung their hat on a desat test.


#7

Great information! :smiley: A lab for detecting hail damage on shingles sounds like a great idea. Planning to find one soon and get my shingle roofing checked! But I guess it still looks the same and new like how it looked when I got is installed by Roof lines in Toronto.


#8

I am a PA and have worked with an individual who wrote the book on hail testing - literally. His process is patented and his protocol is being used by the insurance industry.

His name is Matt Phelps and his company can be found at: inspector general now com

(the dot is obviously a period and there are no spaces - this site did not like the link)

Joe Grasso
Grasso Public Adjusters
Texas / Oklahoma / New Jersey
855-247-2776


#9

And what book is that? And what is his process?


#10

[quote=“InsurerPerspective”]

I am a PA and have worked with an individual who wrote the book on hail testing - literally. His process is patented and his protocol is being used by the insurance industry.

His name is Matt Phelps and his company can be found at: inspector general now com

And what book is that? And what is his process?[/quote]

Book means the protocol used, not a book written that I know of. As for his process he would be better at explaining than me. Good luck.


#11

[quote=“GPA”]
Book means the protocol used, not a book written that I know of. As for his process he would be better at explaining than me. Good luck.[/quote]

I just looked him up. Appears to me he was a wastewater engineer his entire career until Hurricane Ike and then (imagine that!) turned into a wind engineer. I see nothing about hail experience, protocols, processes, patents in that area. In fact, I’m in the insurance industry and deal with hail damage issues and laboratory testing every day. I’ve never even heard of his protocol.


#12

I wonder if GPA and Matt have a lot of insurance claims that they both are involved in. Hmmmmm…


#13

Thats interesting because I just did a background on him. What I came up with he was employed by EA Engineering and the city of Austin for less than 22 months of his entire career. Also, ummmm… Hurricane Ike was September 13, 2008. Where do you get your info? Wait, the insurance industry is your source. Figures. I dont know this guy from adam and your reply is shitty. Where is your patten? Your laboratory testing? Your protocol? Right!!!