Is this a properly done rubber roof?


#1

hi guys,
Im building (remodeling) an old house here in chicago and my conractor installed a new rubber roof. the sloping did not look right in the first place and when I checked one day after it rained, it looks like the roof is just collecting sitting water (look at the pics below).

my questions here are:

(1) is this a properly installed roof? (it does not look like it to me).
(2) how should this be fixed? will this have to be completelly removed and redone?

thank you, ssl

http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/7817/cimg05251nh5.jpg

http://img370.imageshack.us/img370/3187/cimg05241dm4.jpg

http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/5476/cimg05221wu4.jpg


#2

Lets start from the begining…

#1. Thats not a rubber roof.

I’ll let everybody else take it from here…


#3

LOL, gtape.

Let me first start with the specs…what was requested in the way of drainage?

Your modified bitumen (GAF Ruberoid, to be exact) will withstand watersoak for up to 72 hours, as permitted by GAF (I am a GAF Master Commercial Contractor). If it does not evacuate the roof by drainage or evaporation at 70 F in that time frame, your warranty is void.

Aside from the standing water, would you like me to tell you abou tthe other defects? Who is the contractor?

Can you post any more pictures?

More to say, but lets see what info you would like, first.


#4

hi guys,
thank you for the info. below are all the images I have taken thus far - Im dont know much about roofing, but it does not look good to me…

yes, please tell me what else you see wrong with this GAF roof. I will have to get this done correctly…

as for the “drainage” that was requested - well, just a roof that would drain properly on a new roof structure on a single family home…

as for the contractor, I dont want to name any names just yet. I will have a talk with him tomorrow, but I would really like to know the pros here say about it first.

thank you in advance,

ssl

http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/53/cimg05282dv3.jpg

http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/7248/cimg05272dg3.jpg

http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/644/cimg05262bv4.jpg

http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/8008/cimg05212hv8.jpg

http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/166/cimg05202yj3.jpg

http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/3706/cimg05191ae0.jpg


#5

How long does it take for the water to evacuate? Who wrote the specs? It isnt finshed, yet, right?


#6

when I took those pictures, the water has been there for about 10-12 hours. looking (from the roof) to other roofs on adjacent buildings in my area, there was no visible water on the same type of “sloped” roofs - my roof looked like the only one with any water on it.

the “contractor” told me that besides some flashing, this roof is finished.


#7

The main thing that sticks out when I look at the pictures is, especially since you live in the Chicago area, all of your flashings are only 2,3,4 inches high, I would expect all the flashings to completely cover the walls all the way around the building ,and thats only about 2-3 ft. high. There is alot of snow and ice buildup there, you need the extra flashing.

we’ll let Aaron continue now…


#8

Well, it looks like everything still need to be flashed. The wooden walls need to be covered. Wherever you have a change of direction, a double layer is required. This normally consists of (is required actually) of the roof field (the sheets in place in the pics) to run up the walls like we see 2-3 inches past the last transition point. Then, a membrane flashing of the same material is to be torch welded to PRIMED walls a minimum of 8" up past the last directional transition, and minimum of 4" (I like to see 6") onto the FLAT of the roof, past the last directional change on the low side. This includes where the low slope turns into the steeper slope…flat runs up onto the steep, steep runs down onto the flat, and then you can continue up the steeper slope. If this isnt done in this manner, these directional transitions will fail prematurely, as these are stress points.

How do your roofers intend to terminate the wall flashings?

Once again, I ask who wrote the specifications used in this scenario. Whomever did and did not address the roof slope would be at fault. Then again, how long does it take for the water to evacuate completely? I know you will not be able to tell today, as we are getting rain.


#9

thank you Aaron ang G-tape of the info. the sloping of the roof is the major problem here - at least what my untrain eye tells me.

the flashing termination still has to be installed, but, and again, I dont think this will solve the problems at large.

as you mentioned, the water is still there (it did rain in chicago last night) and Im not sure how long it will take to evaporate. still, there is way too much water standing there. even then, the roof is not so huge that this could not be made to slope properly - the whole house is 25x60 and the roof is in three sections: front deck (to be installed on top of the roof), pentouse (a structure above) and back deck (this roof seciton is not up yet).

what can be done to solve the slope of the roof? does this have to be all taken down and redone? or is there another solution to this?

thank you, ssl

below is what the roof specs were as per my plans from the architect:

Roof Membrane Notes

  1. ‘Flat’ roof membrane is to be single ply modified
    bitumen, atactic polypropylene (AAP) type SP-4 as
    manufactured by U.S. Intec, Inc. or approved equal.
  2. Surfacing is to consist of an aluminum coating
    compatible with the membrane to provide resistance to UV
    degradation.
  3. Sheet metal flashing, counter flashing and caps, shall be
    22 gauge minimum galvanized steel.
  4. Provide curbs and flashing systems as required for vent
    pipes, skylights, chimneys and other items indicated.
  5. Provide flashing as needed to make the roof work water
    tight. Roof shall be water tight at completion of the
    project.
  6. Gutters and rain drainage accessories shall be heavy ga.
    copper, unless noted otherwise.
  7. The roof system and related flashings shall be
    warranted against defects in material and
    workmanship for a period of 10 years following
    Owner acceptance. Warranty coverage shall also
    include the complete repair and replacement of other
    building components which are damaged as a result of
    a roof system failure.
  8. The completed roof shall be free from all conditions
    which led to ponding of water. Ponding is hereby
    defined as any body of standing water which does not
    evaporate within 24 hours of being deposited on the
    roof.
  9. Provide roof membrane protection boards over all
    surfaces within 3 ft. of rooftop HVAC equipment.
  10. Terminate membrane a minimum of 8â€

#10

I know one thing it does not look right. I dont know much about low slope roofing but that is holding too much water in my eyes.


#11

I read your post at the other site.

I still need to know who was supposed to make sure of the roof slope. If it wasnt in the roofer agreement, and youre the GC, then it is on you, unless the roofer agreement stated something along the lines of “to archiect’s specifications” Even then, did you enter into an agreement without any additional roof pitch in hopes to save a few bucks, also hoping that the existing pitch would be sufficient.

Water evacuation by drainage or evaporation would be key here.

72 hours is allowed by the mfg.


#12

[quote=“AaronB.”]I read your post at the other site.

I still need to know who was supposed to make sure of the roof slope. If it wasnt in the roofer agreement, and youre the GC, then it is on you, unless the roofer agreement stated something along the lines of “to archiect’s specifications” Even then, did you enter into an agreement without any additional roof pitch in hopes to save a few bucks, also hoping that the existing pitch would be sufficient.

Water evacuation by drainage or evaporation would be key here.

72 hours is allowed by the mfg.[/quote]

aaronB,
the same GC did the new rafters and the plywood on the roof - he is also the one that “hired” the roofer. Im only the homeowner, my GC is doing all the hiring / work.

Im having a meeting tomorrow with the GC and my architect, hopefully all this will get somhow resolved… but as you mention, the only way to make this right is to get the roof pitched properly at the start… no idea why this is not the case as the whole roof covering (including the plywood) is all new… :x

Im was not trying to “save” any money, so Im baffled why all this would happen…

I’ll keep you guys posted to see what happens.

thank you, ssl


#13

OK. Knowing youre the homeowner and not the GC helps.


#14

Did I see a hole for a scupper in the bricks there? If my eyes werent tricking me I saw one, though it was unflashed. More scuppers could help drainage immensely. A drain on a little dog leg around a corner and untapered does not seem very effective to me. Lots of things going on here, but drainage being the main issue, not sure theres enough roof area judging by the pictures for even tapered insulation to be very helpful… a “sump pump” to the drain would be the best way if done with insulation, which is basically an exaggerated taper done with an extra layer of insulation to the sides of cant strips to form like a ravine that would force the water only to the drain… its very labor intensive, thus, expensive though. Your contract is with the gc, sounds like to me, so thats who you go after. You personally do not have a contract with the roofer. If it does not leak, grab some soap and enjoy it. If it leaks, you chase the gc and he chases the roofer. He will beat the roofer because he states no ponding water for 24 hours. I think the gc is a snake and the roofer is an idiot. A stand-up guy that wants it done right would have said exactly HOW the water should be drained, i.e. tapered insulation, rather than broad terminology. Thats my take, do with it as you will