Is this a problem I should fix?


#1

I am about go for new roof, gutters, siding, and trim on my house and want to make sure everything is done right this time. The attached photo shows where my attached garage roof ridge meets my house. Because of its height, there is a break in the soffit and gutter to allow for the ridge shingles to extend over to the second story wall, and the fascia has been cut to allow this. Other than the damage caused by improper installation at the roof/siding interface (premature failure of the siding material there and below) it doesn’t appear to be a real performance problem to date, but… This type of interference just looks like it could be the next weak link in the reliability of the construction.
First, without removing soffit, gutter, and fascia, it is hard to imagine how one would properly secure the ridge shingles that penetrate under the fascia. Second, one would likely have to take special measures to secure the soffit board near the end where it must be cut to allow for the roof penetration. And third, this arrrangement causes the gutter to be discontinuous, which doesn’t look good, and exposes the roof ridge to direct runoff from the second story roof.
What opinion do any roofing experts have about this concern of mine?

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_cARngjNpiSs/SU3v33hK4vE/AAAAAAAAABY/b7B6uiHf_Vk/s160-c/GarageRoofPhoto.jpg


#2

If there is a break in the soffit then sucuring the ridge should not be a problem. As far as doing this yourself i would get a pro thats a pretty steep roof. As far aas the run off use high quality ridge materials like timbertex or shadow ridge. As far as the soffit they make palm nailers for the j channel that could have been used when the home was built. Without a close up of that area i can not tell with that picture being that small. Hope that helps.


#3

Hi,

That picture does not help much.

Removing everything is not going to help you nail that ridge cap.

There is no way to get the gutter to connect.

How did you come up with these questions? This could help answer your concerns.


#4

From the picture I could not give you any advice on the ridge. As for the siding it looks as if it was cut and installed all the way down onto the roof line. This practice is causes the siding to wick water directly off the shingles when it rains causing the siding to fail along the whole roof line. The siding has a finish on it to protect it from the elements. As soon as you cut the siding the cut edge has no finish and that’s contributes to decaying and rotting siding at roof lines. I see alot of this esp around chimneys.

If your using “ANY” type of natural siding product or fiber siding “INSIST” on having the cut edges sealed and “INSIST” on having the siding installed so it’s at least 1/2 an inch above the roof line so you can see the metal flashing.


#5

Thanks for the responses. None of them suggested that the interference between roof ridge and roof overhang was considered a problem - just something that could be dealt with.

Sorry for the quality of the photo. Yesterday was a rainy day, and I didn’t want to go on that roof when it was wet.


#6

Do you have a photo from a different spot that shows how the two roofs intersect? I’m curious why it wasn’t figured out during framing?..DaveB


#7

http://picasaweb.google.com/mcg16005/GarageRoofPhoto?authkey=qidbk78MlC0

Here are more photos, taken today at great personal peril. These show more clearly that someone failed to correct a framing mistake, and simply worked around it.


#8

Yes! Replace that wood with new and make sure it’s cut far enough back to “NOT” touch the roof line in any area.

PS: Notice on your last picture the siding on the right is cut far enough up to see the metal flashing? That siding is not messed up from wicking like the siding on the left side of the picture.


#9

Yes, but that little section happens to be the exception - not the rule.

At any rate, all of the soffit and fascia on the house will be replaced with fiber cement material, and all work will be done by the same lucky contractor. The question is whether I should have the garage roof framing modified or redone as part of the process. It is clear from the photos that the work around that was done (probably during original construction) has some trickiness to it that can lead to premature aging and stress of the materials.


#10

Its a bad design detail. You should take the facia and soffit apart to roof & flash to the wall sheathing. you may find some rot in there.


#11

After replacing wood I would put step flashing behind gutters up to ridge with them bent under roof line above


#12

When the gutters are reinstalled don’t have them drain at that location. And if the siding is installed as previously mentioned… There is no need for any additional framing.


#13

In a perfect world i would want my siding to be an inch or more above my shingles(not the decking) so that water and yard debris can flow without getting trapped.
Make sure that now happens since you are replacing all your siding.

But The only REAL problem you have(and only RooferR addressed)

is the gutter.

That is a gutter persons super cheap way of not installing the down spouts.
It ruins the roof it was trying to protect and defeats the very purpose.

I would tell you straight out that you need 2 downspouts. You absolutely cannot drain it to your roof like that.
And I don’t care if you don’t want the down spouts and don’t like the way they would look.
It has to be done.
That voids your shingle warranty and my warranty on the first day.
There has to be a gutter there or your shingles(fasteners) below will live a very short life.

You need to have 2 downspouts.
One on each of the opposite sides of those gutters.


#14

Thanks for the advice. Some excellent points to help me refine the scope of work and get optimized value.


#15

Can you have the new gutters installed with closed ends there and drain them away from this point to downspouts on their far ends? If the gutters can be made to drain away from here then you might be able to install a sheet metal diverter to drain the narrow section of upper roof into the gutters? or just let that narrow part of the upper roof drain onto the garage ridge??..DaveB


#16

The diverter idea sounds good. Those are more typically installed at the bottom of valleys, right? Are you suggesting just a straight piece of sheet metal bent up to vertical at the edge of the overhang, or something more complicated, that sheds the water left and right?

Having the gutter drain toward the house corners should not be an issue, since the current setup has drains at each corner anyway.


#17

[quote=“m_griggs”]Are you suggesting just a straight piece of sheet metal bent up to vertical at the edge of the overhang, or something more complicated, that sheds the water left and right?
[/quote]

Hi, I'd ask you roofer what he suggests? If you cap the ends of the gutters and drain them to the far ends that should eliminate 90% of the water. Here in Ca. they sometimes just use the bent up piece of sheet metal to divert water away from  a porch or similiar location but I don't know if that will work if you live where it snows so I'd see what your local guy recommends first but definitely stop those gutters from draining onto the garage peak...DaveB

#18

Work has proceeded on my house. I spoke with the contractor at length about my concerns, and he has constructed it according to the attached photos. He installed flashing from the upper roof edge down to the garage roof, and covered it with the fascia board (notched again). Gutters haven’t been installed yet, but the construction here won’t do anything about the rain run-off onto the garage ridge. Because the gutters won’t be continuous over the garage ridge, there will be a roof area (2.5 ft wide by 44 shingle courses) draining directly onto or around the ridge. Should I press the contractor to address the drainage issue differently?

It is also clear that he has not installed any kick-out flashing at the intersection of side-wall and garage roof edge. I have found this installation requirement in codes and fiber-cement board installation instructions, and yet it isn’t being met. Why not? This lack of detail caused premature failure of my siding before. On the side where siding meets brick, I think it is even more important to do something about diverting water. Any opinions?

http://picasaweb.google.com/mcg16005/RoofSidingProgress?authkey=0ejZHMsX6qw&pli=1&gsessionid=ssNCiQfabbx92ilk2mZSoQ&feat=directlink


#19

m_griggs wrote, It is also clear that he has not installed any kick-out flashing at the intersection of side-wall and garage roof edge. I have found this installation requirement in codes and fiber-cement board installation instructions, and yet it isn’t being met. Why not? This lack of detail caused premature failure of my siding before. On the side where siding meets brick, I think it is even more important to do something about diverting water. Any opinion

Should have made diverter out of first step flashing in those parts and small half cricket behind chimney.


#20

dont be botherin you roofer to much.
sometimes that can have a reverse effect.

gweedo.