Is there a temperature rule to follow


#1

Hello Everyone! I am new to the roofing industry and wanted to know if there was a temperature rule about replacing shingles? As in; can it be too hot or too cold to replace a roof? If so, what are the temperature “rules”?

In Christ,

Blair


#2

40 degrees and up.


#3

I’m sure all the guys from Canada are rolling on the floor at that one. I’ve put many shingles on in below zero conditions… Hand nail, hand seal and they won’t look great till they warm up and “lay down” properly but there is nothing wrong with installing an asphalt shingle roof in cold temperatures.


#4

“You can laugh all you want but the manufacturer’s suggest 40 degrees and up.”


#5

**“You can laugh all you want but the manufacturer’s suggest 40 degrees and up.” **

Link? I’ve looked both at Certainteed and GAF installation manuals and neither says this.


#6

Why hand nail in cold weather?


#7

Prolonging the agony is its own reward. :badgrin:


#8

Certainteed Warranty requires 4 or so days of 70 degree weather before your warranty starts. If they are nailed down good an architectural shingle will be fine to install in the winter. 3 in 1 shingles will blow off before spring. My personal preference is 30 degrees or above after that the nails blow through, and I don’t hand nail.


#9

its nice if you can keep your material in a garage overnight,or at least covered to keep the frost off. Archs suck to cut when they are that cold,usually cut with a pair of snips,aviations work but a a set of 10" or 12" works best


#10

When is a good time to replace a roof, can it be done in winter

I am a Certified Installer for Certainteed corp. and they recommend the temperature be 40 degrees and rising with as much sun as possible.They do not recommend installing the shingles if they have been in freezing temperatures. They want you to let them be thawed so to speak and at least 40 degrees or higher because if you try to nail them when they are cold they will crack underneath on the back side and that can cause a shingle to fail and leak.

Cold Temperature

ARMA (the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Association) and
most glass fiber shingle manufacturers caution against the installation
of glass-reinforced shingles in temperatures at or below 40 degrees F.
At these temperatures, the shingles may be stressed, fractured, or
broken as they are handled and installed. The damage inflicted
may not be evident until after a year or two of weathering.

Guidelines for Asphalt Shingles

Roofing materials become very stiff and easily cracked if a contractor attempts to install them when outside temperatures are below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. For this reason, crews should never be allowed to install these materials below this temperature. The materials, being stiff, will not lay flat on the roof. Damage is easily done to the materials because of their stiffness and cracks and tears can appear. Be very leery of any contractor that tells you it doesn’t matter how cold it is when he installs your roof. Here’s why. Asphalt shingles have a sticky tar strip on them that adheres to the shingle above it. When weather is cold, the adhesion does not work well, leaving a shingle loose and subject to being torn off in any higher than normal wind.

Can my roof be shingled in the winter?

Most shingle manufacturers do not recommend installing shingles below 40 degrees; some manufacturers will even void the warranty. The shingles have a tendency to break or crack easily when temperatures are below 40 degrees. For those reasons we adhere to the manufacturers recommendations and we will not install certain shingles during the cold weather conditions.

Asphalt shingles can be installed properly during cold weather (late fall and winter) only if additional, costly measures are taken. Most asphalt shingle manufactures require that a specialized adhesive is manually applied to each shingle if temperatures are below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. If shingles are applied below 40 degrees without the specialized adhesive, the manufacturer will void any warranty.

Fiberglass shingles are some of the most likely shingles to break in cold weather. The adhesive on shingles may also fail to stick in cold weather and may not become fully adhered to the roof until summer. To avoid these issues, avoid roofing in temperatures below 40 degrees F.


#11

“…Be very leery of any contractor that tells you it doesn’t matter how cold it is when he installs your roof. Here’s why. Asphalt shingles have a sticky tar strip on them that adheres to the shingle above it. When weather is cold, the adhesion does not work well, leaving a shingle loose and subject to being torn off in any higher than normal wind.”

I’d be more “leery” of any contractors that don’t mention hand nailing and hand sealing in the colder temperatures.

Still waiting for links to manufacturer’s sites stating not to install their products under 40 degrees fahrenheit.


#12

Above 40° you say?.. I better tell the builders to hold off until spring :roll:


#13

Were below 40F here from October till March, and we still roof. It’s a lot slower but still able to do it.


#14

Because a gun will blow the nail right through the shingle. and then you get this;http://www.roofingtalk.com/


#15

[quote=“roofermann”]

Because a gun will blow the nail right through the shingle. and then you get this;http://www.roofingtalk.com/[/quote]

You know you can and should adjust the air/gun pressure for the temperature your working in. In the summer I find I have to turn it down as the day and shingles heat up


#16

We try to avoid it. But if we have to, keep an eye on the weather and the orientation of the roof slopes. If it gets good sun for a number of days… we let 'er buck.


#17

Having been in the roofing business almost 30 yrs and Wizard certified by Certainteed…40 degrees is indeed the cut off. We always monitor our air pressure on compressor and if you use bostitch or Hitachi guns the depth setting can also be used to prevent blow through. If it doesn’t reach safe temp before noon…we take day off or do other work.


#18

I spent 20 years as a manufacturers inspector and heard this question every winter. Usually from the same guys. If I recall our “recommended” temp was 42 and rising. As many mentioned asphalt will easily crack at cold temps. Ultimately the roof will not perform as expected. HOWEVER, precautions can be taken that will allow for installation below this temp. Most importantly keeping materials warm and field laminating. Personally I would not ever go below 32 and if possible do something else. Most of these cold days are not very productive and less profitable.