Is ridge cut warrantable?


#1

Hey all, Im glad this forum is here and appreciate your input…
So my question has to do with what is considered a warrantable application of “Cobra” shingle over vent.
I recently completed a job for a women( a total nightmare of a CUSTOMER). Since completion she has had another roofing co. come to inspect my work(passed). A co. of some sort of which she would not disclose to me for a mold/mildew inspection, due to the fact that we sustained rain/ice while her roof was under tarp ( she was convinced moisture had gotten inside), and now a month after having completed the work, she has taken notice that as I installed the ridge vent, we unfortunately sliced into 5-6 rafters ( some as deep as 3/4 in.). So of course she called yet another building contractor of some sort to “inspect”. This is where the topic really comes in to play…
The “inspector” noticed that in the garage alone (not on the main house roof) that I made my 2" cut along one side of the ridge beam and not on the other.I have been researching online, and all I can find is specs indicating the overall net free area required ( no specs on requirements for width of cut.) As I stated the width of my cut is not the issue, (2") but that I did not cut both sides. Can anyone please offer some friendly advice? This homeowner still owes me $500.00, so of course my main interest is to appease her enough to get my money! But I feel very strongly that I gave quality work, and performed in an ethical manner.I want to tell her to f- off but I must admit Im having a hard time breaking from the " customer is always right" mantra.What would a manufacturer say if it came to the point of them inspecting? Would they even be willing to inspect something like that? This is unchartered territory for me. I have 13 yrs of experience w/asphalt shingles, and have never dealt with this kind of b.s.
Thanks in advance…


#2

Always cut on both sides of ridge. Also snap a chaulk line for your cut as they always end up looking. I believe GAF calls for 1" on both sides of ridge. Also set your saw depth about 1/16" deeper than the wood.


#3

So cutting 2" on one side as opposed to 1" on both sides is different somehow?


#4

Hi,

Yes, exspecially if there is a ridge beam. The ridge beam will give resistance to the air flow.

Without a ridge beam the air flow will not be as much concern as having to installing the ridge vent off center.

The situation may occur that you land up with a small plywood peice at the ridge. Then it may be best to cut on one side. If you cut both sides you may weaken both sides to the point of uslessness.


#5

Hey poproofing,
I did the same thing 12 years ago and had to go back and cut the other side as well.
Never made that mistake again.


#6

Thanks for the input so far…I guess my question is also …how should I proceed? How would you ? In researching the specs, I have found that the major concern is a proper sq. in. to sq. ft. of attic space ratio.

[quote]Calculating Your Ventilation Requirements

Example: Calculating the number of lineal feet of Cobra® Exhaust Vent needed for a 30’x 40’ attic:
Step 1 Calculate attic square footage
How: Multiply length of attic (in feet) times width of attic (in feet)
30’ x 40’ = 1,200 square feet Intake ventilation MUST be at least equal to exhaust ventilation. To determine the number of intake vents needed, select your vent on page 12, and install enough vents so that their combined NFA is at least 288 square inches.

Remember:

Always have a balanced ventilation
system. In no case should the amount of exhaust ventilation exceed the amount of intake
ventilation.

Step 2 Calculate NFA (Net Free Area) needed for this attic by using the “1 in 300â€Â[/quote]


#7

Hi,

Does it have a ridge board?

If so cut it out and put the ridge vent back on. That has to be the easiest way to make everyone happy. You will spend more time in court then it will take to redo the ridge vent.

Your customer will be happy. The customer will refer you. After you go to court, you will have a customer that will refer to you as a contractor that had to be taken to court to resolve an issue.

You can split hairs or put this behind you.


#8

I’ll agree with Lefty. If it is a truss system without a ridge pole, no problem.


#9

Regardless of our opinions, the actual Manufacturers Specifications RULE.

Which brand of Ridge Vent did you install?

Since you copy/pasted the venting calculation information from the Cobra Vent site, was it the Cobra Snow Country or one of the Cobra Roll Vents?

I know the specs for the Shingle Vent II from Air Vent require a cut on both sides of the ridge board/beam.

Look up the manufacturer of the product that you did use and download their installation instructions.

Ed


#10

Go to her and ask her what needs to be done to make her happy. Be sincere. use your salesman skills.

Do what she asks as long as it is reasonable


#11

Here are the specs for Cobra Snow Country Ridge Vent.

Ed

STEP 2
Instruction For Slots
After calculating the total length of Cobra® Snow Country™ ridge vent needed,
determine the necessary slot opening required.
NOTE: If installing on an existing roof, remove the cap shingles from the ridge.

Roofs with a single ridge board: cut an opening along the ridge, 1 5/8" on each
side
(Figure A).

Roofs with a double ridge board: cut an opening along the ridge, 2 5/8" on eachside (Figure B).

Mark off and cut the slot opening, making sure that the ends of the opening
stop at least 6" from any end walls and at least 12" from hip and ridge
intersections or chimneys (Figure C).
Where short ridges (dormers, ridge intersections) are used, mark and cut the
slot making sure that the end of the opening stops at least 12" from the ridge
intersection (Figure D).

STEP 3
Ridge Vent Installation
Place, center and conform the Cobra® Snow Country™ ridge vent over
the slot with the vent resting firmly against the roof surface. Attach
the vent section with roofing nails through the pre-molded nail holes.

**Nails must be at least 1 3/4" or longer so that they will penetrate through
plywood decks or at least 3/4" into wood planks **(Figure E).

Note: 3â€Â


#12

Cut both sides. Also, I use the 2 inch rule on both sides. GAF calls for the 1 5/8 inches on either side, which roofer is up there with a 5/8 ruler??? Hehe.
I use the 2 inches either side and call it good. I am no where near the reverse exhaust formula with the extra 3/8 of an inch on each side, and I have no one question whether I cut “enough” to vent. Have had multiple inspectors, commercial and residential (houses to large name hotels) walk my work on the inside of the attics and hear nothing but approval. I use the Manufacturer’s Installations Instruct. as a minimum. (Dont go crazy though :slight_smile:

Sounds like you screwed up and whatever you have to do/pay to fix the prob, do it. I’m with Lefty on this one (coincidentally same handed too). Court and W O M is too costly and valuable to waste on some time and possibly, roofing material.
Word Of Mouth
bmcroofer@gmail.com


#13

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

Does it have a ridge board?

If so cut it out and put the ridge vent back on. That has to be the easiest way to make everyone happy. You will spend more time in court then it will take to redo the ridge vent.

Your customer will be happy. The customer will refer you. After you go to court, you will have a customer that will refer to you as a contractor that had to be taken to court to resolve an issue.

You can split hairs or put this behind you.[/quote]

Excellent point. You didn’t cut both sides, which is the main point of contention. Tell her what you’re going to do and ask if there is anything else you can do to make her happy. If financially possible, I’d even fix the problem and tell her to keep the 500. Trust me, 500 is small change to keep her mouth shut and spread negative word of mouth. Or at least a discount for her troubles. It never fails…