Ideas needed


#1

I found a picture of a fix involving sister rafters and plywood gussets at the peak. Is this something that would work? I just want a functional roof, it doesn’t have to be beautiful. Is a little sag acceptable? What should I do?


#2

call your insurance agent and double your homeowners policy


#3

What your roofer attempted to do was install a purlin wall. However instead of transferring the weight on to the celing joists he should of located the top of a wall in the attic to rest his “stiff legs”. Iw ould recommend that you cut the span in half by usingf this method. Nail a 2x6 perpendicular to the rafters and if they are 16 oc, put a stiff leg every third rafter or24 oc put on every other rafter. 2x4 rafters equals poor framing, nominal or not. Make sure there are legs coming down from theridge to top of wall as well. ben


#4

hello framerben,
nice to see your trade represented.
alot of people here have theese sort of problems and i cant help, cause i know better to mess with settlin houses sagin decks.
very difficult to repair.

understandin weight loads and jackin things up, makin things square again, is an art in itself.

good post.

gweedo


#5

Hey ben,

I was thinking the same thing about the 2x6, but I was thinking to put one on the attic floor also, acrss the joists, to distribute the load more evenly.

2x4 construction was very common back in the day, and it has held up quite well for over a hundred years on my dad’s house. When we did his roof, his were a little saggy, but only after five roofs were installed ontop of one another. When we took it off, they sprang right back.

The balloon framing of the walls and floors had not fared so well.


#6

Aaron,

yes you can do that if there are not any walls in the area to bear the load. However, I would stand the 2x6 or even a 2x8 up edge ways with 2x4 kickers at a 45 degree angle coming back down to the celing joists about every 6 feetto keep it from rolling over. This will be much stronger acting as if it were a header, bearing the load of the roof. this is what we call a trough or strong back. If possible allow the trough to be long enough to go from awall at each end and build up both ends underneathto the wall so it is not even resting on the joists anymore. this will allow it to deflect and not make your celing sag too. If you really want to put some $$$ in to it you could even use a LVL, from wall to wall. Elevate it and jack each rafter up as much as needed by cutting your stiff leg LONG and banging it in there. Good luck Ben


#7

i like framerben.

gweedo.