Help me get my roof replaced


#1

I have a few questions before I get started replacing my roof.

  1. Type of nail gun:
    I am going to buy the Bostitch RN46. I’m guessing this is a good choice. It will only be used once and resold.

  2. Type of fastener:
    I heard electro galv is a poor roofing nail. What type of fastener should I purchase (type of metal and coating).

  3. Length of fastener:
    I have 1/2 plywood sheathing and I am installing a 50 year architectural shingle. I heard if they nails are too long they can work their way out. I was going to buy 1 1/4in nails. Please give me your opinions on what size nail to use.


#2

“1. Type of nail gun:
I am going to buy the Bostitch RN46. I’m guessing this is a good choice. It will only be used once and resold.”

I don’t see why you would buy a nailgun. It will only be good for roofing and for the money you spend on it/compressor/coil nails you could have hired an experienced roofer for a couple of days. I roofed daily for 15 years and my right arm never jammed, I still hand nail when I need to jump up on a roof.

“2. Type of fastener:
I heard electro galv is a poor roofing nail. What type of fastener should I purchase (type of metal and coating).”

You need special coil nails if you’re using a gun. Not sure how much variety they offer. I think just about any nail is going to outlast a asphalt roof so no worries there. Hot dipped galv sucks for hand nailing though, the burrs tear your fingers up.

“3. Length of fastener:
I have 1/2 plywood sheathing and I am installing a 50 year architectural shingle. I heard if they nails are too long they can work their way out. I was going to buy 1 1/4in nails. Please give me your opinions on what size nail to use.”

Depends on the decking + shingle thickness. If you’re using a 50 year shingle chances are good you’re looking at either a 1-1/2" or 1-3/4" nail. Check the shingle specs.


#3

i would use 1 1/2" with a 50 year shingle. i will buy your gun when your done for 1/2 price :wink:


#4

I was going to buy one off ebay for around $200 with shipping. Then I was going to turn around and sell it for $150 when the job is completed. After fees and everything, I hope to only lose around $60 to $70. I figured this is better than renting one . :smiley:

I contemplated doing it by hand, but I figured I would save a lot of time using a nailer. I already have a compressor. I just need to buy the gun, extra hose, and coil nails.


#5

a nailgun for a beginner means high speed f-ups :mrgreen:


#6

It is much better to hand-nail your shingles. This will help ensure you do not over-drive and under-drive your fasteners. Next, you need your nails to penetrate the wood roof deck and come out the underside 1-inch.


#7

I was actually worried about that. I looked at the bostitch gun and it has nail depth settings. I was just going to use a scrap piece of wood and one shingle to make sure that I have the depth set correctly before starting. Is it industry standard to use nail guns?


#8

The problem with your plan is that your nail depth will not be set so much by the setting on the gun as it will be the setting on the gun AND the pressure in your compressor. If you could some how keep the air pressure constant, then it would all be good, but you can’t realistically do that if you are trying to make good time. The best thing you could hope to do is carry a hammer with you and bang down the under-driven nails. As for the over-driven nails that have blown through the shingle or damaged the fiberglass matte, you should technically replace them, though nobody actually does that. So in the end, I still recommend hand nailing, and it is was I specify when writing project manuals or scopes-of-work.

And for what it is worth, the 1-inch penetration I was talking about actually deals with screws in metal roof decks. I’m not sure about nails on shingle roofs off the top of my head; I’d have to go and look it up to be sure.


#9

i believe as long as the nails penetrates through the wood you are good i.e.: 1/4" shingle + 3/4" wood = 1" so 1 1/4" nail will suffice. this is what is recommended by GAF and certainteed


#10

I would rather have a longer nail than a shorter one; surely a shorter one has a better chance of backing out (& no, I didn’t call you “Shirley”).

As for hand nailing vs. gun, I use a gun all the time. Hand Nailing is primarily for repair jobs where it’s not worth the time to get the air compressor system set up.

In my marketplace (Texas) I could not compete if I did hand projects only. The time / labor costs would completely price me out of the arena except for only the top 1% of all consumers (& as of late, I’m not meeting / greeting / estimating them).


#11

I guess it depends on your locale because I know for a fact handnailing sells tons of work for us. My company doesn’t own a roofing nailgun. People up here love that hand nail old world crafting crap, lol. I’ll pass on the charcoal soldering pot and the irons though, I gotta draw the line somewhere. I used to hand nail when I was working by the square too. Back then I averaged about 10-12 square a day on a 10/12 or under. My best day ever was 16 and 2. I can rock with a gun to though and it’s sweet to wear gloves in the winter. Can’t do that hand nailing.


#12

ditto monkey

gweed