Green Roof Systems (manual or specs)


#1

Anyone here do many of these? & I’m not talking “green” in the way of simple energy efficiency, but more like an organic “planted” roof.

I have a somewhat burgeoning market here in Central Texas (Austin is a very eco-friendly town) & would like to dig a bit deeper into this.

I know the NRCA has a green roof systems manual, however as I’m not a member I’d like to see where I can bypass the $ 150.00 expense (especially considering my suspicion that it’s not too technically challenging a process).

Thanks, y’all.


#2

Hi,

That is where you would be wrong.

Weight is the first issue.

Installing a roof that will hold up under these conditions.

Knowing what plants will grow in this enviorment.

Being able to get them to grow…


#3

By “technical” I meann one doesn’t have to be a chemist to understand how to properly select the right types of membranes or an aerospace certified sheet welder to make a watertight* surface.

*Unless these roofs are actually designed to drain in a specific or certain way.


#4

start with manufacturers.hers a list of the ones i use
sarnafil
johns manville
hydrotech
siplast
soprema
they run the gamit of systems from pvc to hot applied to torch down.
most of the green roofs i install are on concrete decks in downtown chicago ill. weight is usually NOT an issue as regular dirt is not used.we use a combo of dirt,pumice,and mulch.
drainage is done pretty much like a regular roof drain. with a layer of scrim.covering everything first so no clogging occurs.
if you decide to do a green roof slow down and up the quality control level x 5


#5

start with manufacturers.hers a list of the ones i use
sarnafil
johns manville
hydrotech
siplast
soprema
they run the gamit of systems from pvc to hot applied to torch down.
most of the green roofs i install are on concrete decks in downtown chicago ill. weight is usually NOT an issue as regular dirt is not used.we use a combo of dirt,pumice,and mulch.
drainage is done pretty much like a regular roof drain. with a layer of scrim.covering everything first so no clogging occurs.
if you decide to do a green roof slow down and up the quality control level x 5


#6

Roofboss,

Thank you.

Thank you.

:smiley:


#7

how is it possible in the real world of bussiness to service green roof if aproblem occurs which is likely in roofing. tell me this all you great minds of roofing.


#8

thats an easy one; first you hand a field order to a competant roofer.then he goes to the green roof and locates the problem area.next, he removes plants,and dirt.lastly he repairs the leak and puts back the dirt and plants and goes to his next repair.however in the “real world” we would have probed and prodded this waterproofing job about 6-8 times so hence there would not even be a leak.next ?


#9

‘Man on the moon’? Why, you whippersnappers are always trying something new fangled & can’t leave well enough alone.

Back in my day, we ate paint with lead in it & we liked it! We didn’t have seat belts in cars & so what if you flew through a windshield @ 50 miles per hour…

“Green roofing…” BAH!


#10

I love how people on this site like to pretend they know everything, it’s a constant source of amusement for me. Thank you!

“Extensive green roofs- generally a shallow layer
(25-100mm) of substrate planted with low-growing
stress-tolerant grasses, mosses and alpine
species. These light-weight systems require little or
no maintenance, and do not impose any significant
weight on the building structure
. Rubble or wildlife
roofs are another type of green roof emerging in
this expanding industry. Such roofs are specifically
designed to provide a valuable wildlife habitat and
replace the ‘foot print’ of the building on the roof
using by products of the development process
such as crushed brick and top soil.”

Try this RH:

thegreenroofcentre.co.uk/pag … 0Sheet.pdf


#11

Thank you, Tar. That’s the sort of info I’m looking for. I was curious as to what the ‘basic’ layers are to the deck waterproofing system.

I will need to do further research to see what kind of engineering is required to support this sort of a system, i.e. if a typical 1:12 to 3:12 / low slope roof has a trussed span of 2x6’s @ around 24" o.c., it’s possible to go 12" o.c. with the same framing system & this is all the added reinforcement one might need.

While I know these roofs aren’t designed to HOLD water (that would be a bog or pond roof, not a planted or green roof), there has to be some process of proper drainage.

We have a tarbuck not too far from me that’s got a green roof & I suspect they had some kind of a national co. do their roofing, but I don’t really know. I will also guess that in the line of frequent questions, who the contractor was is up there. I need to stop in & check it out.

Thanks again, Tar.


#12

just make sure you have a good contract and limit you liability.

the green roof industry right now is like the wild west. there are no standards and really no long term testing. its a sound idea sod roofing is not new. i just think there may be long term problems.

neglect is going to be the first. what will happen when there is a load of dried out hay on the roof. who becomes liable for the fire. the roofer the landscraper or the owner.

what if a animal builds a nest in a drain and clogs it.

how are these things anchored down is there a blow off risk.

how will these roofs drain when they are frosen. a sponge is light and drains but not when it is frozen. than it is a brick. than ad a snow load to that.

there are just a lot of unanswered questions that lawers will be looking for answers for after the first disaster.

be careful.