Fixing an error


#1

some years back when I was just starting out I did an addition for some friends of mine. Everything came out great. The roof of the addition butt up against the existing house, and rather than step flash it, I put a piece of continuous flashing. It was one of the first roofing jobs I had ever done and I read somewhere that this was an ok way to do it (must have been from one of you southern boys). They have a very expensive tile floor inside and every now and then I have nightmares about it leaking. I’ve pretty much made up my mind to just go fix it at no cost to them(black GAF 3tabs so new shingles should match pretty well) but I’m wondering if I should let them know I’m coming, and if so, what to say???


#2

Hi,

How big is the overhang?
Which side of the house is it on?
How big is the bend onto the roof?
How tight did you make your cuts to the wall?

These all make a difference on the effectiveness of the flashing you used.

I have seen this type of flashing work with no problems.


#3

well the overhang above is 1 ft. and I would say that the roofline with this overhang is about 8 ft from the peak of the addition. Pitch on roof of addition is 4/12. I actually did the continous piece of flashing with step flashing. I know i know. rookie mistake. i did close them up quite a bit, maybe showing 4" on each piece of flashing. Typical sized flashing, probably 5x7 so 2.5 on roof and 2.5 up wall. Cuts are pretty tight to the flashing, and I also used a generous bit of cement between the shingles and the flashing.
But all that aside, I’ve pretty much decided to fix it. I think about it every time it rains and had a dream about it last night, hence this post. I just hate going back and saying hey I messed up but i’m gonna fix it. I guess thats better then having it leak and getting the phone call I don’t want. I know everyone makes mistakes but i hate embarrassment.


#4

Hi,

I am confused.

Are you saying you put the step flashing on top of the shingles?

You also layed the step flashing in a bed of roof cement?


#5

caulk the wall, the way you did it is not the best but it can still work. I wouldn’t touch it unless a problem arises.


#6

lefty, no step flashing under the shingles entirely. Step flashing not cemented to roof or wall, but shingles cemented to step flashing


#7

i just read my last post and it still didn’t seem clear to me. sorry. the step flashing was underneath the shingles


#8

Hi,

From what you have written, I do not see how your flashing could leak. It has less of a chance of leaking then just step flashing.

I would not touch it.


#9

Hi,
I don’t think Lefty is getting a clear picture of what you did.
you must go back and install step flashings properly.
Step flashings must be installed under the siding or a separate counterflashing of some sort on the wall side.


#10

Ok I will try to be as clear as can be. I appreciate everybody’s feedback.
Roof was felted in. Largely with water and ice.
Next step, I laid regular pieces of step flashing where the roof meets the wall. Under the siding, and under the shingles. Not interlaced with the shingles, but entirely under the shingles.
Next I ran the shingles, leaving a fairly generous bead of asphalt under the shingles over top of the flashing. Then siding was run over top of step flashing. I can’t remember if I knew to kick the last piece of step flashing over the siding or not, but that’s an easy 10 minute fix.
Hope this was clear enough and if anyone has any new input I’d love to hear. thanks


#11

Where r u located Where i’m at we get alot of rain and the way you did it would not last and its not code.


#12

Hi,

I understand what he said. With his last post I believe what I said even more.

From what he has written, I do not see how his flashing could leak. It has less of a chance of leaking then just step flashing installed “correctly”.

I would not touch it.


#13

I agree with Lefty.

Your saving grace, was that you cemented the shingles down to the metal.

The only thing I would do now, as an afterthought, is to run a new bead of sealant at the edge of the shingles nearest to the wall, just to diffuse the potential of water migrating under that edge.

Since you installed ice and Water Shield, i presume this is located in a winter type climate.

Did you happen to run a section of Ice and Water Shield along and up the side wall too? I know, probably not, but at least worth asking.

So what! Rookie mistake that you want to man up to.

If you do go out there, just inform them that this follow up call is part of your warranty follow up service that you recently instituted and that you will be providing a free roof tune up for them, all for the measly fee of them providing you with 3-5 names as referrals that you can contact with your company information and let those people know that they referred you to them.

Make some lemonade out of the situation.

Ed


#14

Thank you all for your input. I feel much better about the situation. Good idea ed-i think that is exactly what I will do.


#15

[quote=“ed the roofer”]

So what! Rookie mistake that you want to man up to.

If you do go out there, just inform them that this follow up call is part of your warranty follow up service that you recently instituted and that you will be providing a free roof tune up for them, all for the measly fee of them providing you with 3-5 names as referrals that you can contact with your company information and let those people know that they referred you to them.

Make some lemonade out of the situation.

Ed[/quote]

So lie to save face…hmmm thats not mannin up,being honest would be.


#16

Kage, while I appreciate your input, nothing that ed recommended included lying in any way. At most it could be considered not being completely forthcoming. What would your course of action be in this situation based on my description of what I did on the roof?


#17

Hi,

Sounds like a lie to me.

Lies of ommision. Shame on them for not catching me.


#18

My response would be honesty telling them basically what you said in your first post,honesty goes alot further than lying,the only thing i think is the lie is saying your doing a checkup as part of a new policy you have,which you didnt in your first post,going there honestly and telling them your cncerns and why will go way farther,like they say,“what goes around comes around” :smiley:


#19

Lies backfire,honesty does’nt,being honest with customers will go alot farther than any gimmick. :smiley:


#20

[quote=“kage”]

[quote=“ed the roofer”]

So what! Rookie mistake that you want to man up to.

If you do go out there, just inform them that this follow up call is part of your warranty follow up service that you recently instituted and that you will be providing a free roof tune up for them, all for the measly fee of them providing you with 3-5 names as referrals that you can contact with your company information and let those people know that they referred you to them.

Make some lemonade out of the situation.

Ed[/quote]

So lie to save face…hmmm thats not mannin up,being honest would be.[/quote]

I think it all depends on how you look at it or what your own character perceives it to be.

You see it as an act of lying by omission.

I see this as an opportunity, not only for this one customer, but all others as well, to add an additional complimentary service, to once again get your name and face and quality oriented reputation in front of them, which enables the Ethical Contractor to solicit additional referrals.

So what if this new add on business concept was created and inspired due to a previous mistake. The intent is meritorious and the end results would leave him with a clean conscience and the customer with a smile on their face.

How many consumers feel there is no merit to most warranties? Have you ever had a warranty problem with any item and were told it wasn’t covered?

Well, what do you think they would say, when out of the blue, you contacted them to provide a free warranty maintenance tune up for their roof?

I think that the word would spread like wild-fire.

That kind of customer service is unheard of, especially in an industry considered to be vagrants and illegals and in and out of business on a regular basis.

If the typical lead cost is 225.00, (Industry Statistics), well, lets just say it cost 100.00 to generate a new customer lead, then if you provide a one hour service and get at least one Quality Referral Lead, you have not only generated a potential for new business at less than the typical lead cost, but also created a new perception of the one unique contractor in the area.

It would be worthy of News PR Advertorials.

Ed