Felt 15 or 30?


#1

Hello,

Should I put down 15# or 30# felt?

I am sure this question has been asked and discussed many times on this site, BUT I have heard arguments for both!

I plan on being in my house for a very long time and the hundred or so extra dollars is not an issue for the investment I am making! I just want to do it right without wasting money!

FYI - I will be using a 40 or 50 year arch shingle!

Thanks


#2

30


#3

mr/mrs shinglehitter,
try readin the “roofing felt” thread below please,
we allready type enough here.

gweedo


#4

ShingleHitter, what’s the slope of your house & where do you live?

If you’re really wanting to gto big time on the vapor barrier, look into a product like Gorilla Guard or some other top shelf product. Here in Texas, it costs about 2x the price of ‘regular’ 30 # felt. FYI, CertainTeed has a 30 # felt that goes 4 squares & from Roofing Supply Group, it’s within $ 2.00 of the price of a 2 square roll of Atlas 30 #.

You can also add extra ice & water shield to the areas where ‘most’ houses don’t get them, which isn’t to say that you are guaranteed to get a leak in these areas, but it’s like driving a Mercedes vs. a Bike – they’ll both get you to work, but one is a bit better in case you have adverse weather (& they both have the potential for making you work harder to get to the finish line). Some of these areas we don’t typically add an Ice & Water is against wall to roof joints, valleys, exposed eaves (outside of the attic heated spaces), across hip tips, along rakes… this can be added in full to all these areas or pick & choose what you want. A LOT of these choices are location specific, i.e. where YOU are based… up North, most of these spots are standard considerations.

If this is an estimate you’re working off of, do you have Starter Strip specificed on the quote or is the installer going to use the “3 Tab Flipped” method? What about metal drip edge? I’m partial to the DL Drip Edge variety. These are two other areas that you can do an improvement over the ‘minimum’ standards.

Write back if you have other questions or comments.


#5

IT DOSE NOT MATTER WHAT FELT YOU USE IF WATER GET UNDER YOUR SHINGLE IT WILL LEAK AND THATS FOR ICE WATER SHEILD TO WATER IS NOT MEANT TO GET UNDER YOUR SHINGLE PLAIN AND SIMPLE I WOULD USE 30 ONLY IF THE HOUSE WAS GOING TO SIT FOR A COUPLE DAYS AND I WOULD TARP IT ANYWAY I DONT TRUST PAPER


#6

Hello Again,

Thanks for the responses!

Sounds like different opinions - ‘roofboss’ says use 30 and ‘swamps of fire’ says it doesnt matter unless you are going to leave your roof uncovered for a while! I do plan on getting this done in a day or two!

RanchHandRoofing- thks for all the information - it was helpful! One more question. I rec’d a quote from a family friend who does some construction work/roofing on the side - he does good work and does not rush his work! I live in Michigan and he has quoted me $50 a square for tear off and another $50 for installation - labor only - which includes putting down the ice guard, felt, drip edge and possibly replacing a few boards. 15 squares is costing me $1500 dollars for labor only - I supply materials. Does this seem like a fair price? I am confident it will be done right!

Thanks again! This site is awesome!


#7

Hi,

Felt is a second layer of protection.

If water gets under your shingles. The felt will keep water out. 30 will last longer then 15.

The synthetics are not a proven product yet. So no one can tell you if they are a better deal yet. I would stick with something with a proven track record.


#8

As for whether or not that’s a good price, I can’t really say because down here in Texas, I’d be in constant gravy if I could get $ 100.00 a square to start…

We’d need to know your pitch & 2 story / 3 story, etc.

Also, there are more than a few Michiganders who are regulars on here; they’ll be able to give you an idea of whether this is a worthwhile price or not. Also, you can request a quote from them if you’re wanting to get work from a full time roofer vs. someone who does a bit of this / a bit of that, etc.

For my advertising, I specifically state that I’m a roofer & NOT the guy to see for sticking doors, window replacement or siding. I specialize in roofing & that’s what I want to stick to.


#9

[quote=“RanchHandRoofing”]Also, there are more than a few Michiganders who are regulars on here; they’ll be able to give you an idea of whether this is a worthwhile price or not. Also, you can request a quote from them if you’re wanting to get work from a full time roofer vs. someone who does a bit of this / a bit of that, etc.
[/quote]

Give me a call. I am one of those regulars and will help answer any questions you might have.

Timothy
Seal Tight Construction
Shelby Township, MI
cell - 586-615-5772


#10

uh mr. shinglehitter,
that would be swamps of jersey , not fire.
and i to, say exactly what he is sayin about felt.

eya later.

gweedo


#11

Anymore thoughts


#12

Anbody seen wet 30lb felt on a roof? Not pretty. For this simple reason I will NOT use 30 lb felt on a roof unless it was going to be shingled moments after felt install.

Certainteed Roofer Sellect 15# for me, Shinglemate is another and GAF makes a good high end 15# felt.

If running 30 lb and thin three tabs you better roof it right away.

Use 30 lb felt for wood shake installs though, first 3ft lap then half lap.


#13

I’m also a non-professional doing my own roof. I’m going with 30# felt. My thinking is, you’re already doing a quality job by doing it yourself, and with the money you save you can afford to buy the best material.

The roofing supply house talked me out of buying 50-year or lifetime architectural shingles, explaining why it’s inappropriate for my 4 by 12 roof. So instead, I went with the 40-year Certainteed Landmark shingles - the upgrade for a house such as mine. I’m also putting in galvanized steel flashing in the valleys under the shingles for added protection.

But I can argue the other way too. The felt is really just a temporary way to protect the house after tear-off until the roof can be properly covered. Some point out that after holes are poked into the felt from laying shingles, the felt is useless as a “second line of defense”. So 30# felt may be only necessary for any high winds expected during this transitional time.


#14

Hi,

Felt works with nails through it. Have seen it many times doing tear offs and also doing repairs. Felt has kept water away from the wood.

Seen shingles blown off. No leak because the flet was there. Lots of nails showing.

Yes, felt works as a second line of defense.


#15

typically shingle mfgr.s require a breathable felt for warranty purposes(#15)as no breathing can cause the paper to blister under the shingles,typically 30# felt is referred to as slaters felt as that is not a problem w/ stone tiles—check w/your shingle mfgr for specs :wink: