Faux Dormer


#1

I was asked to provide a roof estimate where the customer wantes a fake dormer removed. What can I expect? How do you remove it and what is underneath? Will there be plywood or will I have to reconstruct? I have a pic but it was too large to post. I can email it if anyone wants to see. Thanks


#2

What is underneath varies depending upon who built it and why.

Some Faux dormers are built to let in light through the window, kinda like a skylight.

Some are built purely for looks in which case it may simply be nailed to the roof, with full sheeting underneath.

Others are built for water management, direct water away from entrances, etc.
This is accomplished with reverse gables also.

Why does your customer want the dormer removed?


#3

I just removed one 2 weeks ago, the decking under mine was complete like they buit the house and came back a few years later and put the dormer ontop of everything.

It took myself and a labor 2 hours to remove the old one clean every thing up and work new shingles into the old roof.

824.00 was what I charged, used two bundles of shingles. Dormer was 3’ wide and 8’up the roof.


#4

This dormer is 10ft wide and 8ft at the ridge. I’m not sure why she wants it removed. She probably just doesn’t like the look. It is above her front door but she has a small awning over her doorway.


#5

Sounds like a reverse gable, if this is the case it will most likely have sheeting under it.
Get into the attic to take a look.


#6

sorry took the pic out to protect the innocent


#7

Unless you have nothing else to do, I would walk from that job or get a carpenters bid add 20% and do the work.


#8

Looks like you’ll have some fascia issues in addition to decking; since that soffit (if it has one) will be tied into the fascia, expect to re-work this area as well.

There’s also the gutter to contend with as well.

Some of you guys might be different from me (& what I typically find here in Central Texas) but I don’t have a really good finish carpenter & I have only come across one crew that had a good carpenter (again, we’re 90% sub crew labor in this market).

Additionally, I have yet to find carpenters who make good roofers… so it’s a trade off.

I’m not saying don’t bid the job, but I AM saying be sure to bid it accordingly & don’t go cheap just to get a little bit of income & beat the other guy.


#9

I am guessing that when you explain the labor and material costs to remove that reverse gable, the customer will choose to leave it there.

All it really needs is to have some siding put on it.
It will look much better.


#10

How about doing the opposite; extend the ridge line about 15’ out off of the house (looks like a back door to me, not a front) then get rid of the awning altogether.

Make a patio out of it or maybe even enclose the space.

Customers like it more if you throw out ideas & suggestions on other ways to do stuff (not that you intend to take up all of hese concepts, but @ least you’re showing folks you can think outside the box).


#11

Well since thats a reverse gable i would say no thanks. The is not going to be wood under that. Piecing that roof together will be not so fun. Why on earth does she want that removed? If a customer ased me to remove that i would say no way.


#12

the less joins or openings you have in the roof ie valleys vents soil pipes less leaks youll get down the line as these are the points that always leak first if its just for look theres on point it being there would be easy to remove just set about it with a mallet m8 lol


#13

http://files.turbosquid.com/Preview/Content_on_3_15_2001_11_14_03/dynamite.zip_thumbnail1.jpg74177245-F5A0-458F-863FE15002204420.jpgLarge.jpg


#14

do you need a permit for that?


#15

rhr,
that is def. a front door from a 1950’s housing tract built from left over wwII lumber i’ll bet…am i right mexi?


#16

Dyn - O - Mite!!!