Extra Shingles


#1

At the completion of a job - If you end up with extra bundles of shingles (i.e 3-4 square or 9-16 extra bundles)

-Would you offer them to the customer?
-Re-adjust the final bill and reflect the miscalcuation in supply cost?
-Call it good and this part of doing business?

A friend of mine had his roof done by a reputable company and swears they had an overage of many bundles - they never offered them to him or offered to adjust the bill. I would assume that a few bundles is the norm, but 3-4 square???

Thanks


#2

BE HONEST and once that is known in your community…


#3

They always belong to the contractor. many will order extra espeacailly on large cut up jobs. I would give them an open bundle that is left over and if they wanted they could buy the rest.


#4

Hi,

We usually have extra shingles.

If he ran short, should he charge you for running to pick up the extra shingles while the crew sits around on the clock.

It is cheaper to have extra shingles at the end.

www.HolencikRoofing.com


#5

The question now would be:

how many extra shingles would be acceptable?

I could understand a few squares and YES you need to have some extra for valleys, mistakes and such! But what if the contractor has for example 5-8 extra square? Does this mean that the homeowner was charged for 5 extra squares and labor on 5 squares???

Thanks again!


#6

Hi,

If he ran short, should he charge you for running to pick up the extra shingles while the crew sits around on the clock.

My contract states what you will get and what will be an extra cost. If you want to limit the amount of materials I bring to a job, then you need to address this at the time you are signing the contract.

www.HolencikRoofing.com


#7

I guess my question would not be how many bundles are left, but what PERCENTAGE of the roof is actually overage, savvy? 8 squares is unreasonable for a roof that is only 25 squares total, 8 squares left on a roof that is 80 squares shows a little bit of laziness or uncertainty about the layout, and 8 squares left on a roof(s) of 240 square is a sign of pure estimating talent! (approx 2%)

As the other roofers have pointed out, the roof bill is usually the total agreed upon cost of the new roof as stated in the contract. Period.

If the customer wants to parse the quoted cost BEFORE the job is done, that is his right. Asking the contractor for the credit for the returns on material and labor is his right but should be addressed PRIOR to the job ending.

Realize if you are the customer, you have agreed to a price which struck you as satisfactory in the beginning for the roof- and therefore, the shingle/labor returns are immaterial and left to the roofers discretion.

That being said, it is an unfortunate occurence of less than reputable roofers to PURPOSELY pad the material bill and process the returns as straight profit. This is flat wrong in my opinion.

Caveat Emptor still prevails right along with word of mouth.


#8

[quote=“shinglehitter”]At the completion of a job - If you end up with extra bundles of shingles (i.e 3-4 square or 9-16 extra bundles)

-Would you offer them to the customer?
-Re-adjust the final bill and reflect the miscalcuation in supply cost?
-Call it good and this part of doing business?

A friend of mine had his roof done by a reputable company and swears they had an overage of many bundles - they never offered them to him or offered to adjust the bill. I would assume that a few bundles is the norm, but 3-4 square???

Thanks[/quote]

Did your friend count the bundles when they were delivered?

Does your friend know how many squares the roof actually takes?


#9

You would not be charged for the labor on the extra shingles because they were never put on. They just sat in the driveway or on the roof or what not.

The price of the roof was agreed upon before the shingles got there. If the homeowner had a problem with the amount of shingles that was to be ordered, he couldve said something then. Sometimes you are over. I usually try to add a square or two just because I know I have had guys work for me who liked to waste to get paid more. If I ran short, I would not ask you for more money because we already agreed on the price.

Ive had it happen both ways to me, over and under on shingles. Its part of business I think.


#10

i get extra on all jobs and i pay for them so they are mine to take. if it is special order i leave a bundle or 2 for them. if they for some reason bought material or the job was subbed out to me then i leave them all.


#11

if its way over then yeh ill adjust.
but 1 2 3 sq i give a couple a bundles to
h/o and take the rest.
sometimes im short and have to get more.
h/o doesnt pay for that.

just depends on how much.

gweedo.


#12

First of all not every contractor charges by the square per say. When i bid a job i measure it for the material quantity purposes only. As for price I will figure how many days it will take my crew to complete the job. I then figure that with my daily cost of operation. I then add in my profit and overhead which then equals the price. So if material is left over which is usually the case (not always 3 or 4 square but a few bundles) we take it back to the supplier or store it in our warehouse. Also keep in mind they may have ordered more shingles on that delivery for another small job to save money on delivery costs.


#13

You have got to watch these guys because some of them will cheat you. If the roofer estimates 15 extra squares than you actually use on the job, I believe he should adjust his bill accordingly. If it takes more squares, you should be willing to pay more than the contract. You just need to get this spelled out in the contract before you sign. An honest person would have no problem with this.

Some unreputable roofers will intentioally over estimate the number of squares because they know the owner has no idea about how much material it will take. If he overestimates 15 squares at $250 including labor, he just stole $3,750 from the customer. Its bullshit to say that he might run out of shingles and have the crew stop working while he is waiting on a flunkie to go get some more shingles. He should be able to tell near the end of the job whether or not he needs a few more shingles.


#14

A contract is for installing the shingles on the roof, not for supplied materials.

If I didn’t use my hammer that I brought out, how much of a credit should I offer?

The home owner had the option at the beginning to choose the contractor he desired and based on reputation and price, he chose the one he did.

Now, did the roof get covered as per the contract?

End of story. Tell your friend to accept that he got what he paid for.

Ed


#15

If you have a signed contract for a said amount to roof a house it don’t matter if your short or have extra it should still cost the contract amount.

Say your 4sq short do you ask the home owner for more money???

I have to admit on a few jobs have ran short like last week ran 7 bundles short on a cedar shake roof. Had to tell the home owner the roof will take another day to finish due to being short on shingles. She felt bad and asked if I wanted more money. Told her of course not. Other than that ran short a couple times last year ranging from 1-2 bundles.

On the flip side if you order 4sq extra you will have to pay your crew to not only unload the shingles on the roof but also load them back up hopefuly carefuly enough so when you bring them back to the lumber yard or supply house they don’t refuse to take them due to being in poor condition. One place in my area that sells a lot of shingles charges a 10% restocking fee.

If you credited the home owner for extra shingles you will loose money.

If you had a contract with a home owner on a per square basis and not on a total job basis than yes the fair thing to do would be to only charge for the shingles installed.

With experiance on measuring and ordering for roofing materials you will not run over a square.

Back about 10 years ago when I was really green on measuring roofs recall one job that I had to load almost 10 sq’s back in the pick up!


#16

Thanks for all the replys on this subject and it now makes sense, but one last question!

When you bid on a roof, I would assume a main factor would be the size of the roof - which would be number of squares! (I know other variable come into play with final cost) - the size then would obviously be a main factor in figuring price!

I would think a roofer would order enough squares needed - plus a little extra (especially if you are using a unique color or brand than may be hard to re-use)! So…wouldn’t a homeowner assume that they were possibly charged too much! Because the extra shingles could be a reflection of a miscaculation on the size of the project!

Thks


#17

IF and only IF, the home owner had a contract that paid piece work, would there be any reasonable expectation on their behalf to expect and consider that they were being overcharged due to unused materials.

If the contract were for a complete roof installation, then they should expect and ONLY expect that the complete roof was done.

I always order more than necessary, since it costs me way more to find out I am even 1 bundle short that 6-8 bundles over. Especially in colder weather or extremely hot weather, some shingles may get damaged and need to be replaced with the spares.

What does the contract say?

Follow that as the guide.

Ed


#18

only way 2 make extra money ,they pay for unused materials that didint get put on ,and you return them to your supplier for credit back bang double whamy…


#19

I supply materials,and if I am over they leave with me. Unless the H.O. is paying for the mat… himself separate from labor,then they are his to do as he wishes…that is why I supply mat., and don’t give a per sq. breakdown, so there is nothing to argue about…I have never had a customer try to get a discount for extra materials…
I subbed a roof from a company that told the H.O. that their hourly guys would take 3 to 4 days to do it,and we did it in 1 12 hour day…The H.O. new I was a sub,and shorted the G.C. $500.00, and the G.C. stiffed me completely…


#20

How petty and ridiculous this conversation is.