Drying out the attic


#1

I live in Minnesota, we have experienced a more frigid and snow filled year then a usual winter. My attic has developed frost on the wood. Its in all of the attic’s ceiling/loft.

I have a roofer coming in a couple days to look at it… I believe my soffits are in good working order, unblocked/that area appears to be dry. I think the insulation level is okay (had some blown in 3-4 years ago…

Is it possible a small vent such as microwave/kitchen exhaust fan could frost the entire attic? (size = lengths is about 50 feet, width is about 25, I believe makes 1250 square feet. Could one 6 inch pipe cause that much trouble, heat up the attic that much?

Or could I blame the new owens corning ridge vent that was installed with a new roof (this past summer)? A few weeks ago I went on my room to clean off some of the snow near the gutters, I noticed there was a fairly good level of snow and ice build up on and around my ridge vent. Is it possible for it to get iced over if its really cold (we have had a few -15 to -20 days/nights this winter?

Problem part 2, we just had a pair of 40-degree days… The ice is thawing, making water marks on my ceiling… I went up to dry off the wood by hand as much as possible to ward off further ceiling damage.

After the roofer finds a solution to the problem (add a new turbine or other vents, finds that its an exhaust pipe… what then? the wood is still a little damp… if there attic now gets proper ventilation, no extra heat, etc what will need to be done? Will the wood dry itself… do I need to find a way or someone to dry the wood in the attic?

Long post/question… sorry I have a big problem and I am looking for all the help I can get.


#2

Make sure soffit and ridge vents are clear,just let dry on own as long as ventings are clear


#3

Couple of things jump out. One, a small vent from the kitchen or bath could certainly cause condensation in the attic. Another thing that puzzles me is the lack of warm/warmer air coming through the ridge vent. If you have no air flow through your eave and ridge vents something is either plugged or your intake is not balanced with the outflow. In other words, the square inch area of the eave vents are mismatched to the ridge vent.

Moisture all over the underside of the roof is condensation not a leaky roof. Often our homes are so tight that the only place for moisture to go is in the attic through gaps in air handling ducts.


#4

Im a little suspicious of owens corning ridge vent. it looks pretty cheap to me. I would rather use GAF snow country. I dont think those low profile vents work at all.


#5

Hi, I started the post, thank you to those have responded already… additional question:

If the ridge vent is part of the blame, could I leave the ridge up, and add turbines (or other vents)? Would that create to much ventilation?


#6

happened to us couple of years ago.We did a tear-off and one of the employees knocked the connection off going to a vent, when winter came got the same call.Before you do anything check all the vents because they might have moved a little when they put new roof on.


#7

[quote=“JML”]

Or could I blame the new owens corning ridge vent that was installed with a new roof (this past summer)? A few weeks ago I went on my room to clean off some of the snow near the gutters, I noticed there was a fairly good level of snow and ice build up on and around my ridge vent. Is it possible for it to get iced over if its really cold (we have had a few -15 to -20 days/nights this winter? [/quote]

Sounds like your ridge vents,clear them and you should have no problems....unless there that shitty we use Omni rolls here in bc, no problems yet.

#8

Dear Sir:

This is a result of condensation in your attic. Get that pipe vented correctly! Also, look or feel for other leaks in wet service piping (above the stove, bathrooms, etc.)
Unlike some, I have faith in the ridge vets, low profile. I do not particulatly care for Owens Corning either, but Trim line, Tamko, and GAF (snow country only) all make a servicable ridge vent. That being said, a common sense approach to the problem is needed.

(a)If snow and ice are blocking/impeding exhaust of air from the attic through any type of vent, that WILL create a problem long term. Hence the use of TRUE Boston Ridge vents in snow country. (I live/work in the Idaho/Wyoming high country).

(b)Also, if the installers crimped the low profile vent while nailing it down or while nailing the ridge cap on top of it (a common occurence), it is possible to seriously impede the venting ability of the ridge.

©If the soffit venting is in such gross excess compared to the exhaust vent on the ridge (meaning WAY more intake than exhaust capacity of the roof), then a reverse flow can be created resulting in moisture being pulled IN the top, rather than air being pulled out by convection (this is extremely rare).

There is not much you can do about the condensation that has found its way into your attic now. Possibly a few heaters (mind the fire hazards) to help dry the attic/insulation out more quickly. De humidifiers work but are a costly alternative.

Additional venting will help and most likely not affect your current situation adversely. I recommend powered vents of some type (gable/roof, solar powered or not). Theese are designed with heat in mind, but they will help somewhat. Again, you are addressing the symptomms with this solution, you need to solve the problem which is moisture bleeding into the attic.

At least that how it looks from my house. Good luck! " )
bmcroofer@gmail.com