Different opinion on roof condition by buyer & seller inspectors


#1

I am buying a single family with a gable roof. My roof inspector says roof is in bad shape and it will last me about 1-yr if I am lucky. Seller states he currently has no leaks but had one in the past and took care of it, he hired his own roof inspector who states the roof will last another 8-yr. Who is right? The current roofing material according to seller is 30-yr Dimensional shingle which he installed 22 yrs ago. He is not willing to provide any credit prior to closing for the roof. Here are some picture my roofer took, let me know what you think, do I need a new roof?


#2

That roofs been leaking, the tar smeared all over are attempts to stop the leaks.
It needs a new roof. New skylight, new everything.


#3

Agree with patchap. Roofing cement is temporary repair when left in the sun. This roof is wore out. Did the 8yr inspection include this in writing? That is just goofy. I can’t believe someone actually would defend this roofs condition.


#4

Yes this is what the sellers roofer wrote on a letter


#5

Is there such a thing as a “25-yr dimensional shingle” versus a “30-yr dimensional shingle”? Initially the seller said he had 25-yr dimensional shingle, now he says its a 30-yr dimensional shingle. He has no paperwork from when he last replaced the roof, no warranty of the product either. Is there way to tell its a 30-yr shingle just by looking at it?


#6

I believe at one time there was a 25 yr shingle on the market (correct me if I’m wrong guys) but it was before my time. And while the shingles themselves might have a few more years in them (not that many though) it appears that the install was sub par.


#7

Also shingles are not guaranteed to last the # of years on the bundle. So to claim it has a minimum 8 more years of life is dumb. They rarely last that # and 22 years out of those shingles is respectable.


#8

About 10-12 tears ago all the standard laminated shingles were 25, 30 & 40 year shingles.

Now they are all “Lifetime”.


#9

The sellers inspector was not honest in my opinion or really doesnt understand roofing.
He probably accepted 150 dollars to write that report to just say exactly what the seller wanted.
Know that no matter what happens between you and seller,that roof needs replaced now.
It is likely leaking in multiple spots, he just might not know about it.
Most people replace their roof when they think they have a bad leak. Especially when they just had a leak fixed somewhere else.
When i tear their roof off, i might find about 10-50 leaks.
22 years is a very respectable lifespan of a shingle.
These lifetime shingle warrantys are completely ridiculous and untrue.
I thought it was rediculous to call them 30 year.

They should have kept 3-tabs at 20 year
And Archs at 25 year.
And even then, it is pushing the envelope.


#10

Good 3-tabs last longer than laminates.

I installed acres of Owens Corning 20 yr 3-tabs 20+ yrs ago and most of them still look very good.


#11

I think it was longer ago than that. I’ve been roofing since 2002 and I never remember seeing a 25 yr arch shingle in person. I can only remember 30, 40, and 50. You must be getting old my friend… :wink:


#12

Listen to your elders! Axiom is right on… 25,30,40…and most of the warranties are pro rated. That means by the last 5 years they are worthless. The 3 tabs were mostly 230 and 240 lb shingles (yes, we did have 215) which are as heavy as most of the lightweight laminates and, surprise, they last a long time.


#13

Thank you everyone for your input. It turns out that the inspector for the seller was a neighbor of the seller, which explains why his findings were not credible. I am working through my attorney and realtor to perhaps maybe hire another 3rd party roofer to do another inspection that is more independent/impartial.


#14

So seller responds and says there is no need to spend more money and hire another roof inspector to inspect the roof and attic. He is offering $2000 dollar credit toward the purchase price. I am concerned because there so many red flags; as you can see from above pictures the roof was leaking at one point and owner patched it up with Tar/sealants/roof cement. Could there be potential problems lurking under the patched up areas (i.e. wood damage, attic damage, mold problems)? Would wood damages be visible if one were go up in the attic and inspect it? Currently owner has an attic with floor insulation, no insulation on the pitched roof. He also states he installed a fan in the attic for ventilation which turns ON automatically according to the attic temperature.


#15

$2000 credit sounds fair to me. Yes it possible when the roof gets replaced their may be a bit of roof sheeting that needs replaced but that’s not out of the ordinary at all. As for mold and damaged rafters I doubt it but yes if its there you’ll be able to see if from inside the attic.


#16

I always tell homebuyers they are better saving their money and having the roof replaced themselves. Cause when the press the seller to reroof it pretty much guaranties they will use the absolute cheapest guy then can find. Many times leaving the new homeowner with a completely horrible (but brand new) roof.


#17

Completely agree with island, don’t worry too much about it. Take the credit, have the roof replaced when you buy the house and you will be good for next 20+ years. That way you get to pick the color and type of material and a quality contractor.


#18

Hear here,
Know that you need a new roof,
So Factor it into the total cost of the house.
Know how much it cost.
How much do you want the house and the property?
Dont call an inspector!
They dont know what their doing!
Call a roof replacement contractor! who does it for a living and is succesful in your area in reputation.

Dont waste his time asking for inspection…
You are asking for a proposal to do the roof.
No you dont have to replace the roof today.
You can patch it for many more years.
But how often are you willing to do it?
Negotiate for price of roof now
Or immediately start saving for it.
I tell my customers when they start paying for one repair a year, that it is time for a new roof.

Also
Concur word for word what the others said.
Dont let him replace the roof now.
If you want that property, You have it done!
They will choose the cheapest for sure!
Their concern is not for quality!
They are only doing it because “they have to”
To sell the house.
They Hate every single dollar they are paying.
They will even suggest shortcuts to potential roofing contractors to try to save money.


#19

If this was in florida,
You wouldnt be able to take my advice
Your mortgage company would not issue a mortgage without the roof being done first
Which would hinder your ability to choose the roofing company you want.
These mortgage companys have learned that they can only expect 20 years out of a shingle roof.
And if they know that the roof is much older than 10 years old, they likely wont accept it.
They dont want “3-5 years left” anymore!
They want more!

Around here in florida peoples homeowners insurance companys are researching when the roof was last replaced.
And when and if they find that the roof is anywhere near 20
Years old, they send you a letter telling you they are discontinuing your homeowners insurance unless you replace your roof and you have so many days to do it.
I dont agree with it, but it does keep me busy.


#20

Agree with roof_lover. For anyone needing a mortgage to buy a home (which is most), the lender will not grant a mortgage without continuous homeowner insurance coverage for the term of the mortgage. In Florida, the trend now is that insurers are insisting on new roofs if the existing is 20 years or more and they count the age starting when the permit was pulled for the existing. Even in the absence of a mortgage, it would be unwise not to have homeowner coverage. My advice would be to have an insurance agent check the roof to see if they’d issue a policy based on its present condition. The answer is unlikely I’d say. I agree with other posters that this roof is past it’s sell-by date but obviously it also depends how desirable you find the home in other respects including the seller’s asking price.