Decra Roof


#1

I am planning on building an addition. I’m assuming that I’ll have to replace the entire roof to make it look consistent, even though there’s nothing apparently wrong with the roof. (I have no idea how old it is, but I’ve owned the house for 7 years)

I assumed that I would just replace the roof with a similar asphalt shingle roof.

I stumbled across Decra roofing, stone coated steel roof.

I was unable to find any positive or negative reviews on Decra. There are bad reviews on Duraloc/Allmet, but it seems to be contained to just that one specific vendor.

I was told to expect a 30% premium over asphalt shingle for the Decra roof. That might be a good investment if this really is the “last rood I’ll ever need”.

Thanks for any help/insight.


#2

I have heard nothing bad around here about Decra, unless installed wrong.


#3

[quote=“Vee”]I am planning on building an addition. I’m assuming that I’ll have to replace the entire roof to make it look consistent, even though there’s nothing apparently wrong with the roof. (I have no idea how old it is, but I’ve owned the house for 7 years)

I assumed that I would just replace the roof with a similar asphalt shingle roof.

I stumbled across Decra roofing, stone coated steel roof.

I was unable to find any positive or negative reviews on Decra. There are bad reviews on Duraloc/Allmet, but it seems to be contained to just that one specific vendor.

I was told to expect a 30% premium over asphalt shingle for the Decra roof. That might be a good investment if this really is the “last rood I’ll ever need”.

Thanks for any help/insight.[/quote]

if it was only a 30% increase, everyone would have it. its more like DOUBLE the price of an asphalt roof (or more, depending on your area) its probably the best looking, and best performing roofing system available anywhere. (besides natural slate) call around, and get some prices from a local reputable contractor that has done decra before. but dont expect it to be cheap. if they tell you it can be done for less than $5 a square foot, i would just hang up the phone. they should be in the $6-7 a sq ft range.


#4

Thanks. I haven’t gotten the budget estimate in just yet. If it matters at all, I’d be going with the least-expensive Decra roof that resembles shingles. I know they make the clay tile looking roofs as well…Don’t know if that has much of an effect on price…

The contractor is the same guy who did my replacement windows and did a fantastic job with the install, so I’m kinda trusting his ability to install this roof. We’ll see what the numbers say, perhaps he was mistaken.


#5

I install Decra at $750 to $1,100 a square (as of 2011), depending on the complexity or your roof. This is what it will cost to have someone do it right here in Colorado. Decra is a great product.

However, my opinion is that full weight concrete tile is a better product (do not use medium or light weight concrete), it is better looking, and if done properly, will last longer, be easier to maintain and repair, and have less chance for failure. Concrete tile is only 10% to 20% more expensive… Just a personal preference, but if you can pay the extra dime, I would at least consider full weight concrete tile.


#6

OK, I did get the pricing and it was just short of double the price of asphalt…it was 80% higher, in case anyone was interested.


#7

Decra has the worst customer service and staff. Steer clear if you expect any follow up. They are an overpriced system especially for anyone that is not located near any of their warehouses (ex. California or Texas); for some reason even if you are closer to Texas, they will ship from California, not sure till this day how that makes any sense. The shipping costs are enormous and the demand is just not there. If you want any clarification around installation guidance or costs per square for materials, DO NOT ask Decra employees as they are useless. They will not provide accurate information. I’m not quite sure how they are still in business. They are a small company that do not stand by their customers but even worse, they hire incompetent employees. Not worth the hassle or the costs of installing this system.


#8

It looks pretty good when you are done, it’s a royal PITA to install.

I had no problems getting the details I needed from the manufacturer.
What the manufacturer doesn’t specify you can think your way through.

I have no idea how they stand by their product, what I installed looks great and is functioning perfectly, there is a little bit of algae starting on one of them I’ve noticed, I think it’s been about 7 yrs on that one.


#9

+1

It does look great but it is a Royal PITA to put down and is a Franklin Mint in materials.

The accessories are the killer too! You look at the price per square and you are kind of okay but then once you price out all the other stuff…wowsers.


#10

We are owners of Barnhart Construction Company in Monticello Iowa. We started installing Decra shingles in 2003 and have approximately 2600 sq installed in Eastern Iowa. We repeatedly had an issue with a leaking roof put on in 2009. The customer kept calling after a rain and telling us he had leaks. Not dripping leaks, but his sheeting was wet. He had a walk in attic and would go up and check it out after every rain. Our first inclination was that the water was blowing in the ridge vent. We replaced the ridge vent, still had a problem. We went back several times and figured out the water was tracking back and wicking down the screws. We filed a claim with Decra, they sent a technician down who said the install was good, and he didn’t know why they were leaking. Decra’s answer was that we used too big of a screw (#12). If you look closely at their installation instructions as they were printed in 2009, they wanted at least 4 screws not smaller than a #8, and for high wind areas they wanted 4 #12 screws. So, we were following the high wind instructions. They also said the screw put in at an angle was tearing the shingles. Once again, they specify the one screw being put in at a 45 degree angle. We sent letters from our attorney, to no avail. We ended up hiring an independent engineer to come look at the project. We had made an agreement with the customer that we would remove the Decra shingles and put on Malarkey asphalt shingles. The engineer’s report states: “In our opinion, the water that infiltrates at the fastener group is coming from the lap splice, which is not designed to be a sealed condition. Water flowing down the face of the panel above returns around the bottom edge where the formed notch is encountered. The water stains show that most of the water that gets into the lap splice is directed to the bottom of the panels and escapes through the weep hole. However, at the top of the lap the panels are screwed together, held apart slightly by the applied aggregate. This narrow gap induces capillary attraction, actively drawing some of the water that gets into the lap up to the fasteners.” I sent the information gathered by the engineer to Decra, of course there was no response. We have (obviously) discontinued installing this product and would recommend that others do not install it either. The company will not stand behind their product. I would be happy to forward a complete copy of the engineers report to anyone who wants to see it.


#11

Agreed - Decra ‘customer service’, both at the regional and corporate level, is extremely bad…although I personally performed my research as to the product itself, the company’s marketing information was extremely misleading, and when three different company individuals (Regional Manager, Warranty Claims representative, product specialist) were contacted regarding support for my project, they refused to help, and were actually condescending and seemingly ungrateful for my business. My suggestions is to find a good roofer like I did, with Decra experience, and do not rely on Decra Corporation for anything.


#12

We have a 14 year old Decra roof. Started noticing black streaks and stones coming off in the last two years. Now almost the whole roof is black. It also leaks Tried to get warranty, but they denied my claim.

STAY away from this product! Worst decision I have ever made.


#13

Wow look at that beautiful lifetime metal roof…
Lol

I’ll share my decra experience.
So i give a bid for a customer who is enamored with Decra about 10 years ago. 4/12 pitch.
They didnt choose me because i was honest and told them i didnt have any previous experience with the product.
I find out the contractor they used said they were experienced in Decra and the roof has been leaking ever since the installation.
It still makes me smile when i drive by and thankful i didnt get the job.

I think the material would work well if you Two ply’d ice and water shield over the roof.
Is its percieved beauty and longevity worth it?
I say no.


#14

Well, the staining and granule loss is associated with the product itself. However if its leaking then it was improperly installed or installed in an area that it never should have been in the first place so I completely understand them denying your warranty claim for that.


#15

Well smartass, leaking was not part of the claim!


#16

And leaking isn’t covered under warranty. That’s not what claim is about. But I proved to them granule loss and black stain is there. So what the he’ll is the 50 yr warranty for then?


#17

Smartass huh, lol. I guess I’ve been called much worse by people who’s opinion I value far more. :wink:

I thought it was pretty fair thing to assume when you say “It also leaks Tried to get warranty, but they denied my claim” that you are trying to get the manufacturer involved because of leaks. I’ll just leave it now as I’m not a fan of internet fights (unless we are debating a real topic). Best of luck.


#18

Well no not fair to assume anything you know nothing about.


#19

B.S. warranties are the norm in the roofing world. I’m not saying its right, but the manufacturers (nearly all of them) know how to give homeowners the “warm fuzzy feeling” and know how to put the right small print in the right places to get themselves out of honoring said warranty.

Best tip I give to people when they ask me about unproven products is not to make a decision based on a 50 yr (or whatever) warranty being offered on a product that has only existed in real world settings for a short time. Still, I find that most customers would rather just hear these magic words though. Such as, "last roof you’ll ever need!/lifetime warranty!/ice and watershield, how can it ever leak!!!/ect


#20

This product has no headlap, it is essentially a single lock design.

This stuff is extremely expensive and difficult to work with, like roof_lover said I think this stuff is reliant on the underlayment to keep it water tight.