Date of Incident for Hail Damage


#1

I have a customer that built a home 3 years ago. He asked me to come out and give him an estimate. I found a lot of hail damage, but we do not have a date of incident. How can I help him? I checked weather.gov with no luck. Any suggestions?

Thanks


#2

[quote=“Advantage2020”]I have a customer that built a home 3 years ago. He asked me to come out and give him an estimate. I found a lot of hail damage, but we do not have a date of incident. How can I help him? I checked weather.gov with no luck. Any suggestions?

Thanks[/quote]

There are some other online resources you might try.

spc.ncep.noaa.gov/archive/
is the Storm Prediction Center.

hailtrax.com is a commercial site that charges for storm damage maps.

Is there a TV station that is on top of weather? Call their weather department and ask one of their meteorologists. If the storm was a big one, they will probably remember it.


#3

If you know the date and just want to verify where it hit and what sizes were reported, use this link:

spc.noaa.gov/climo/

Here is one to check out all reported storms or just select weather related incidents based on State and County designated search criteria.

www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi … ent~Storms

Ed


#4

I have read different opinions on the size of hail that actually causes damage. I have read .5" and other posts that have stated 1.25".

Opinions and Ecperience…


#5

It depends on the angle of impact and the velocity, as well as the mass of the hail that makes impact, and also, on the amount of air space under the shingles, as in a re-roof being more susceptible than a new roofing installation directly over solid deck sheathing.

Cosmetic damage is also damage to the functional life of the roof material.

The defined “Minimum” criteria, to even be applicable for creating enough destruction to matter, is .75 inches in diameter.

Ed


#6

It doesn’t really matter what date you use. If the hail damaged it 5 months ago but you are able to use a “date of loss” from 3 weeks ago, you have effectively bought the customer a bit over 4 additional months to get the repairs completed.

I suggest you use a date of loss that somewhat reasonably resembles the geographic area where your clients house is.

Additionally, if you are relying on a date to match reported hail size, then you’ve missed out on some great opportunities.


#7

The date of loss, and the date of discovery are two separate issues and is why hail / etc. loss claims can be established years later.

Policy promises, and the stated and/or implied spirit of those indemnification promises, in place at the time of the “event / incident” occurring, are to be kept.


#8

ClaimHawk,

What of the situations when a claim is turned down, due to there being No Reported incidences of Hail within the past 12 months?

Ed


#9

The NOAA link is a pretty good wind / hail event research tool.

Look on the page, towards the bottom right-hand side, to plug in a date/area to search.

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/climo/reports/today.html

All hail events are not reported, and those that are may not be reported accurately.

You can also have a local insurance agent do a C.L.U.E. (Comprehensive Loss Underwriters Exchange) search on other properties in the area to see if hail claims pop-up.

Too, if that particular property is not in the C.L.U.E. database because of a hail claim, that alone may help prove the property was never reported as being hail damaged.

oci.wi.gov/pub_list/pi-207.htm

claimhawk@gmail.com