Certainteed nailing lines


#1

Hi All, Finally picked out some shingles and got them delivered on the rooftop. They are Landmark 30 year georgetown grey. The instructions say to nail somewhere between the three lines but I only see two printed lines so I’m guessing the third line is the edge of the laminated area? The two lines visible on the shingle are at the top edge of the double lap and up on the single part. Is it better to nail thru the double part even on lower pitched roofs? The nails will have less cover than if they were up near the higher printed line but the should be stronger thru the double part? Which is prefered on lower slopes, more nail cover or thru the double part?
Thanks, DaveB


#2

Certainteed will cover the warranty as long as the nails are between the top and bottom line. The only problem is it’s very tough to nail above the two lines without breaking the shingle. The top line represents the top of the shingle underneath.

When you nail between the middle and top row you are going through two layers of shingles with the nails. When you nail between the first two lines you are going through three layers of shingles.

All my guys nail through the two bottom lines.

You made a nice choice on shingles and color, that’s the color on my house roof and detached garage.


#3
So do I understand it correctly...The bottom line is not a printed line but is the bottom of the double laminated area? and it is best to nail thru this narrow doubled area even though that puts the nails close to the edge of the covering shingle? 

My wife picked out the color, I’m happy with it :>) and was very glad to be able to have the boom truck stock the roof. I had to trim a tree limb and remove a section of fence but it beat carrying 66 bundles up the ladder!
Regards, DaveB


#4

You want to put the nails between the two lines on the double laminate section. You don’t want to put any nails on the bottom side of the lowest line. The idea is to have no exposed nails.


#5
Hi Dougger, I think the problem is my shingles only have two printed lines instead of three. There is no printed line at the bottom of the doubled area, I can use the edge of the cutouts as a line though.   There is  one printed  line at the top of the doubled area and another printed line up where the edge of the underlying shingle falls. If I nail in the doubled area the nails are covered by the overlaying next course shingle but just a little bit.
Regards, DaveB

#6

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnWgz-mVMXU)


#7

OK, I figured out the problem. The first bundle I opened didn’t have the third line, the second bundle did. I guess the printer was out of ink on the one bundle :>) . It took me a couple of courses to figure out how to apply the senco gun correctly but now I’m doing fine.
Thanks, DaveB


#8

Try to always nail between the bottom 2 lines. This is the common bond area. The common bond is where both shingles meet, so when you nail through them you are nailing through two pieces, giving much better holding power. The problem with Certainteed’s “Wide Track” nailing area, is that it is only giving you one layer of shingle to tear through, which causes several problems. 1. If you are on a step slope the bottom portion of the Laminate, called the blank or the shim, can slide out and down. Certainteed says this won’t happen with their improved sealant. 2. If you live in a cold weather climate and install shingles in cold weather, the shingles will not seal down immediately, and will be prone to more blow offs with out the protection of nailing through both layers of shingles in the common bond area. It may be alright to nail in the “Wide Track” area in warm temperatures, because the shingle will seal down quickly. But we have seen here in Indiana that the shingle is still prone to more blowoffs, even when sealed down, because it was not nailed through the common bond area.

Go to the link below, scroll down to “Nail Asphalt Shingles”, and click play. In the video you’ll see Landmarks, Hunter Green, nailed in the “Wide Track” area, sealed down, and that were coming off in sheets.

reesewholesale.com/video/index.php


#9

[quote=“MColpetzer”] The common bond is where both shingles meet, so when you nail through them you are nailing through two pieces, giving much better holding power.In the video you’ll see Landmarks, Hunter Green, nailed in the “Wide Track” area, sealed down, and that were coming off in sheets.
[/quote]

Thanks for the link, that's a very helpful video. I've been practicing with my nail gun and can hit the doubled strip pretty good now.....DaveB

#10

[quote=“MColpetzer”]Try to always nail between the bottom 2 lines. This is the common bond area. The common bond is where both shingles meet, so when you nail through them you are nailing through two pieces, giving much better holding power. The problem with Certainteed’s “Wide Track” nailing area, is that it is only giving you one layer of shingle to tear through, which causes several problems. 1. If you are on a step slope the bottom portion of the Laminate, called the blank or the shim, can slide out and down. Certainteed says this won’t happen with their improved sealant. 2. If you live in a cold weather climate and install shingles in cold weather, the shingles will not seal down immediately, and will be prone to more blow offs with out the protection of nailing through both layers of shingles in the common bond area. It may be alright to nail in the “Wide Track” area in warm temperatures, because the shingle will seal down quickly. But we have seen here in Indiana that the shingle is still prone to more blowoffs, even when sealed down, because it was not nailed through the common bond area.

Go to the link below, scroll down to “Nail Asphalt Shingles”, and click play. In the video you’ll see Landmarks, Hunter Green, nailed in the “Wide Track” area, sealed down, and that were coming off in sheets.

reesewholesale.com/video/index.php[/quote]

Welcome to the forum.
A wonderful video, it should be imprinted in every shingle roofers brain.