Certainteed equivalent to GAF Timberline Prestique 40?


#1

Hey everyone:

This is clearly an invaluable resource. I’m a homeowner in wet but beautiful Vancouver, Canada, and I definitely need a new roof. I was initially opting for GAF Timberline Prestique High Definition 40 in “Weathered Wood.” Seems like a good bang for the buck. However, I’ve read quite a few posts today, and there seems to be a general concensus here amongst those in the know that Certainteed shingles are, simply, of better quality. I hope I am correct. My question is pretty simple: Which Certainteed product is equivalent to the GAF Timberline Prestique High Definition 40? Thanks so much in advance to anyone who wants to respond.


#2

Certainteed Landmark Plus


#3

I concur Kage and yes Certainteed is the superior shingle for quality


#4

Everyone has their own opinion…I prefer Malarkey,the equivalent would be their northwest xl


#5

Well everyone knows my opinion is GAF. Their product has become much better since the merge with ELK. If certainteed were better, there would be less complaints from homeowners and less lawsuits against them.


#6

If you live in Vancouver you could check out Pabco shingles,they have 30,40,& 50yr shingles.


#7

GAF…CertainTeed …6 of 1 half a dozen of the other. Pretty much same quality.


#8

I stock and sell both products as well as BP and Malarkey. The midweight category that you are looking at is a good place to start. The look of the GAFELK 40 High Definition is what is unique. They have taken a lighter shingle, and “tricked” up the look based on granule presentation. An exquivalent or better is the Certainteed Landmark Premium Maximum Definition series. It is heavier, rated by Consumer Reports as Number 2 rated shingle, and is overall a good quality shingle. Weight versus weight you would have to move up to GAFELK Timberline Prestique LIFETIME HIgh Definition to compare apples versus apples. We currently sell the GAFELK LIfetime for less money than the Certainteed product due to exchange rate issues. If it’s a money issue, Malarkey Northwest XL 40 c/w Scotchguard provides the most leak resistant design available, and the best bang for the buck. But for thickness and definition the other two noted above have a richer more textured look and better curb appeal.


#9

[quote=“gordholio99”]Hey everyone:

This is clearly an invaluable resource. I’m a homeowner in wet but beautiful Vancouver, Canada, and I definitely need a new roof. I was initially opting for GAF Timberline Prestique High Definition 40 in “Weathered Wood.” Seems like a good bang for the buck. However, I’ve read quite a few posts today, and there seems to be a general concensus here amongst those in the know that Certainteed shingles are, simply, of better quality. I hope I am correct. My question is pretty simple: Which Certainteed product is equivalent to the GAF Timberline Prestique High Definition 40? Thanks so much in advance to anyone who wants to respond.[/quote]

If the product lines are similar to what they are here in the Seattle area, one advantage of the CertainTeed brand will be the availability of the algae resistant component in the Landmark (30 yr) and the Landmark Premium (not offered in the 40 yr landmark plus) GAF/ELK does not offer the AR in the Timberline Prestique 30, 40 or lifetime, at least here… This will not be a complete panacea for everything that wants to grow on your roof, and is only warrantied against a black algae, but empirically we know that it has an impact on moss as well, and I think it’s an important consideration when choosing your product. Anything that will reduce maintenance and keep your roof looking pretty for a longer period of time is something you’ll appreciate.


#10

Certainteed Landmark, Plus, Premium, TL over any Timberline shingle.

Been on tons of roofs this Spring with Timberlines 6-12 years old with cracks all over the shingles.

There are other brands I would recommend before a Timberline shingle.


#11

I’ve also encountered the old Timberline 40 yr. issues…I never liked them before… The only reason I use the now is because I used Elks before the merge,and now Gaf/Elk Timberline Prestique are really the Elk shingle with the Timberline name…
I’ve also installed Certainteed 40 yr shingles that never sealed,and the company rep told the builder to have his roofer HAND SEAL the shingles,lol…YEAH RIGHT!!! 52 sq 9/12, 11/12 hip with 5 square worth of cap,lol…They offered no other option!
In my opinion If you got it, flaunt it…If you are upgrading to 40 yr may as well go all the way to 50 yr., Life time shingles…And if you go to life time shingles may as well go all the way and get a designer shingle like Grand Sequoia, or Slate Line, or something that the whole neighborhood does not have.If you are going to spend the money any way, may as well be unique, and enjoy the look of a beautiful roof…For as long as you can…If not just get a 30 yr shingle and be happy if you get 20 yrs out of it…,lol…no matter what you choose…


#12

I have been selling and installing Certainteed shingles for 13 yrs.
I have never had a problem with any Certainteed shingle, ever…

From my experience GAF is close behind Certainteed as far as issues.
Timberlines tend to lose a lot of granules which isn’t too surprising given the amount of loose granules in the package.
I have had properly installed Timberlines blow off, but not enough to say that it is a problem with the entire line.
The most consistent issue I see with Timberlines is granule loss.

I have never had a problem with Tamkos either, but we don’t install very many of them.

Owens Corning, we installed 1,000’s of sqs of classics in the mid 90’s, once the siders were done we haven’t had any issues with these either.
I have seen a few recently and they are holding up very well for a 20 yr shingle.
We had color matching issues and manufacturing defects with the Oakridge line, and some blow offs.

The Duration line appears to be a pretty good shingle. We have only installed 3 Duration roofs so it is a bit early to form a solid opinion about them but they are looking pretty good so far.