Beginners' questions


#1

hi, i’m going to start doing roofing, have some experience, but still i never ripped off shingle. my question is where do i start ripping it off, from the top of the roof or from the bottom?)) it is possible to do it either way but which is the original way?
thanks)


#2

Start at the top :idea:


#3

Top going down on a steep pitch and top going sideways on a walk on seems to be the most efficient.

Ed


#4

what kind of experience did ya say you had again?

did you do some previous roofing without ripping off shingles?

mostly tear off from top down.
do 3 or 4 ft across the top then move down
another 3 or 4 ft all the way across.

gweedo


#5

Thanks for asking this AK, I am going to replace my roof here shortly and also wonder about some hints for removing the existing roof.

I have watched other shake roofs come off and it looks like they dig under the layers with a shovel, pry up, and make a roll as they go with the tar paper. Is that the general idea?

Then once you have the material off, you just go around and pound in any protruding nails?

Anything else to look out for?


#6

Usually top to bottom works good but today what worked best for the 18/12 was from the bottom to the top. You see the roof started about 5ft off the ground so with a toothy shovel you could go almost all the way up the steep section from the ground.

With racked shingles going straight from top to bottom is best. With stair stepped shingles side ways works great.

Then you come across the roofs that the shingles sealed so well you have to stop a lot and break up sections that one person can carry.

The roof today was a 30sq 4/12 (plus shed mentioned) and with four people it was tore off in three hours. Pitch forks for the shingles and the toothy critter to pull the nails.

If you tear off from the bottom up you are working against gravity. The only lifting of shingles should be from the roof surface after they have been torn off to toss directly into the dump trailer or dumpster.


#7

Asphalt is normally work from the top and move from top down.

Shake or Slate is fastest using a long stright clawed hammer and you stand facing up the roof and swing the hammer across your body making sure to catch the shake or slate in the nailing area with the clawed part of the hammer. Again work down.

Roofs are laid from bottom up so it only makes sense that they come off in reverse order.


#8

thank you, guys!))
actually, it was easier than i thought) right!) there’s no other way than to move from the top down) and you realise it as you start doing it right away))

thanks again))


#9

your welcome.

gweedo.


#10

[quote=“AK”]thank you, guys!))
actually, it was easier than i thought) right!) there’s no other way than to move from the top down) and you realise it as you start doing it right away))

thanks again))[/quote]

Once you start it is pretty easy to figure out how it comes off best.


#11

Sorry to hijack the thread but I have a related question. When tearing off a roof do they normally throw off the debris all around the outer perimeter of the roof closest to the sections they are tearing off and then gather it all up from the ground?

Or do they take all the tear off debris to one spot of the roof closest to the dumpster or dump truck?

When tearing off a shake roof with skip sheathing does debris fall thru the skip sheathing cracks. Is this debris entering the attic ever an issue.

TIA


#12

**Sorry to hijack the thread but I have a related question. When tearing off a roof do they normally throw off the debris all around the outer perimeter of the roof closest to the sections they are tearing off and then gather it all up from the ground? **

Yes

**Or do they take all the tear off debris to one spot of the roof closest to the dumpster or dump truck?
**

Yes
**
When tearing off a shake roof with skip sheathing does debris fall thru the skip sheathing cracks. Is this debris entering the attic ever an issue. **

Yes and yes.