Asphalt roof shingles, 2nd layer questions…


#1

I need help ending a disagreement between my spouse & I about redoing the asphalt roof shingles on our 20 yr old house. Currently we have original builder’s shingle, the roof is getting older but has no leaks or missing shingles.

I am of the belief that, unless something is leaking or there are other roof issues, usually contractors will place a 2nd layer of asphalt shingles on top of the 1st. That only when a 3rd layer needs to be put on that the 2 previous layers need be removed. I am thinking of the possibility of un-needed work not to mention the added expense, especially if it’s is compleatly un needed, that money could be used to cap the sophit in vinyl and get new gutters.

My spouse believes that the original roof shingles should be scraped off, carted away regardless of the expense, & the new shingles installed without shingles underneath. Is set on this being the proper method.

Again, 20 yr old L-shaped ranch style home, original plain asphalt shingles, no roof damage.

Opinions (Pros & Cons) needed to end the debate so we can finally get the roofers here and we aren’t bickering in front of the poor guys!

Simply signed:
JMKM in a dispute :roll:


#2

99% of roofers nationwide like to tear off. The reasons being are check the wood for damage, install ice & water shield (which you currently do not have and is NY building code), generally 2nd layer doesnt last as long as it should, extra added weight to the frame of your house, replacing flashings. In NY it has been common over the years to do this practice, but it is becoming frowned upon by the industry.

If you want it done right…tear it off. spend the little extra now to save yourself alot later.

where are you in NY?


#3

I’m Down state, way off to the east.

Is it also true that darker roofs dont last as long?

If I end up having the roof stripped down, and it done the correct up-to-code way does that mean all the flashings where the L meets on the roof and the chimney need replacement? What about drain pipe vents etc?

It’s a big roof, being a ranch, obviously I want better shingles, we dont want to think about another roof till we are old and grey and selling the house

JMKM


#4

if you were down here in florida ide say
put a second layer on. we do it all the time down here.
but the guys are rite when your deali with ice build
up. your gonna want your bottom edge to have the ice
and water sheild put on.

so the wife wins,
but only because you live up north.

gweedo.


#5

:smiley:


#6

new roof means “new roof”. this means replace “ALL” flashing details. what town downstate?


#7

I’m Down state, way off to the east.

I’m about as South East NY as it gets.

**Is it also true that darker roofs don’t last as long? **

Since a light and dark shingle of the same type come with exactly the same warranty…I’d say that is false info.

**If I end up having the roof stripped down, and it done the correct up-to-code way does that mean all the flashings where the L meets on the roof and the chimney need replacement? What about drain pipe vents etc? **

Depends on what you had there before, what condition it is in and what (if any) extended warranty you choose. If the flashing is in good condition and deemed to last the life of your new roof then I see no reason to replace it. That is rarely the case though.

It’s a big roof, being a ranch, obviously I want better shingles, we don’t want to think about another roof till we are old and grey and selling the house

Ok, in that case you have 30yr, 40yr and 50yr (“limited lifetime” = 50yr) shingles. You want 50yr shingles (I like Certainteed TL), all copper flashings and a full tear to bare wood.

You can re-cover (2nd-3rd layer) but it cuts the life of the roof, often doesn’t look great and for things like roof protrusions/walls instead of using flashing you are butting the new shingles to the wall/etc. and caulking the gap, which is crap. There are other issues that come into play like double the weight on your roof…not being able to use ice and water barrier…not knowing if the flashing is compromised… You get the picture.

Bottom line:
Adding another layer is great if you want to sell your house I guess but you sound like you’re settled and ready to protect your investment. Bite the bullet and do a full tear and replace and have peace of mind. Keep in mind you will get what you pay for in this business.


#8

As an installer, I would never put new shingles on top of old ones. Mainly because I won’t give it the same warranty I would on a rip. As mentioned above, you should have at least 3 ft of ice sheild. Secondly, shingles on top of shingles are more prone to “blow-offs”. Asthetically, ripping the existing shingles will give you a more appealing look. A second layer will not sit and look as flat.
The bottom line is a new roof costs alot either way. You might as well spend the extra money and get it done right.