Anybody run starter strip up the rake


#1

I have seen pictures of people doing this. I understand why there is a need to run a starter at the eve but what benefits do you get from running it at the rakes.


#2

Yes. We always do. 3/4" overhang at rakes.


#3

oh bread
did all the roofers in your local bar chase you away.
starter up the rake gives support to the singles if you are not metal edging. it keeps the singles from curing over the edge.
it also give you a nice crisp line so when the home owner looks up at in most cases the only part of the roof he will ever see it looks nice.


#4

[quote=“Hoss”]oh bread
did all the roofers in your local bar chase you away.
starter up the rake gives support to the singles if you are not metal edging. it keeps the singles from curing over the edge.
it also give you a nice crisp line so when the home owner looks up at in most cases the only part of the roof he will ever see it looks nice.[/quote]

That makes sense. I didn’t do it and my overhang is only 3/8" as per manufacturer instructions. I guess the only thing I would be missing is a straight rake. I was worried that it had some water shedding function.


#5

I’ve always used them.

You have tar up the rakes too, to help prevent blow offs.

A roofer once told me, “Of course I use them, for money from the builders”…

Seen a roofer who would not use a bleeder with three tabs on his left gable (right handed) but would on his right gable.


#6

oh no you didn’t
you used the “t” word.
you better hide.


#7

[quote=“dougger222”]I’ve always used them.

You have tar up the rakes too, to help prevent blow offs.

A roofer once told me, “Of course I use them, for money from the builders”…

Seen a roofer who would not use a bleeder with three tabs on his left gable (right handed) but would on his right gable.[/quote]

Your not the only person who puts tar on rakes and eves. I heard a couple other people on here mention that. I would think it would be better to just use tar with no starter coarse because the tar would grab the actual shingle. I wouldn’t be too happy if I saw my shingles missing with my starter strip still tacked down. This would be at the rakes of course. I don’t have a choice at the eves.


#8

years ago your trim work told who done the roofing jobs. then these young guys who didn’t know how to roof started doing jobs and that went to hell so contractors started complaining about trim work and the roofing contractors started running what they called dead men runs up the rakes. they did this for no other reason than to charge extra money and use up materials since they got paid by the square. some peaple say it gives stability to the shingle. this is bull shit thats what drip edge metal is for. once drip edge and bull is put on those shingles they wont drop unless you leave more than 1" hang over on your shinles


#9

drip edge up the rake makes the whole job look cheap.
almost no one does it in these parts.


#10

[quote=“RooferJ”]drip edge up the rake makes the whole job look cheap.
almost no one does it in these parts.[/quote]

Wow, that crazy. I put white ODE on my house and I like it. Of course I removed the small drip edge and had holes to cover.

It took a few years but finally talked all but one builder into having me install the drip edge on the eaves and rakes.

I’ve noticed that the really educated home owners ask for drip edge. The ones who live in million dollar homes and drive hundred thousand dollar vehicles seem to do more research on their roof than say a home owner in a two hundred thousand dollar house driving a twenty thousand dollar vehicle.

Honestly you don’t really need tar up the rakes especially when using laminates. It’s a little over kill but a roofer who overkills is better than a roofer who try’s to cut things short.


#11

Its not done in these parts I think for looks more than anything else. the majority of our jobs are million plus homes on the Atlantic ocean. many of them have ornate rake molding and trim details that if you put drip on it, it would look foolish. as far as quality goes we always run a half pass of I&W up the rakes with starters giving the proper overhang.


#12

its all about location. here we use rake metal on every house and i have never even seen anyone put starter up the rakes. i have also never seen it as i was tearing off a roof. i did notice this spring that in the outer banks, NC that there is no rake metal and a overhang of shingles…and every single multi million dollar ocean front home had sagging shingles at the rakes. (every single one…no exceptions)


#13

you wouldnt see that here.


#14

We call 'em "Bleeders"
I don’t use them although lots of folks around here do. Along w/ rake metal.
Problem is, you are eliminating the overhang, if you cut the shingle flush to the bleeder.

The point of overhanging the rake is to uh let’s see, "overhang the rake"
As long as you overhang the edge, I don’t care what you use for an edge.

I remember telling a carpenter/ framer once about running the decking to the ridge “The peak of the roof is the peak of the roof”.
He actually got it. It’s nice to meet a smart one every once in awhile.


#15

I use starter up the rakes as well as use DL drip edge.

IMO, the ‘perfect’ outline on a 30 year shingled roof would be fascia, wooden drip edge, DL metal, felt under the rake drip / over the eave drip & starter with the corners mitered & an extra dab of mastic to seal up the corners.

I look to starter on rakes & eaves as 1/2 watertight (i.e. first course underlayment) + 1/2 preventing blowoffs (which is why I use true starter vs. 3 tab flipped or 3 tab with the tabs cut off).

We use drip on rakes in addition to eaves because rakes get humidity issues & can rot out as well as eaves.


#16

Yes, another roofer who calls them bleeders, nice!!!

My dad’s been calling them bleeders for 30 years.