Anybody roof like this?


#1

Were those cushions under the flashing?

:smiley:

http://roofersreview.com/d/6688-3/replacing+chimney+flashing.JPG


#2

they were couch cushions that these jerks were using to keep from sliding rather than setting up the correct staging. My best worker and very good friend fell because some jerk had him on these. He broke his neck and his back, and has a fake (metal?) ankle from it. If i see this on a job anywhere i’m going to hit the brakes in my truck and find the supervisor and snap his neck so he can get the picture. Probably not really, but this is truly negligent. I will call OSHA.


#3

Hmmmm…the roofers that just did my roof used some cushions like these. I thought they were just for kneeling or protecting the shingles.


#4

Have you made it through any rainstorms? people that take shortcuts usually know a lot of them.


#5

going further into this i see more problems… aside from the hypocrisy of the roofers using the bungee on the ladder, the ladder is not three rungs over per osha code but two, and their bungee is an obstruction that can easily be tripped on… I would literally smack the guy that set up the ladder so i could save a life. Maybe the idiot wouldn’t forget then that dead workers are unhappy workers…


#6

Well they definitely need some toe boards on this one. But I myself have used cushions in the past. On the real hot days they keep me from scuffing up the shingles. I don’t know that I would call OSHA on anyone though. I have been present as a worker during an OSHA inspection and it really is not a pretty site.


#7

This particular roof doesn’t look very steep to me, but its a bad habit to be into. How much time does it take total to stage a whole house, maybe an hour or two tops? Don’t we roof so we can live? Seems a little redundant to me.

I’ve been onsite during OSHA inspections also, and the violations were FOOLISH. You don’t take a job if you don’t know what youre doing. My old boss had us sixty feet in the air on alumapoles, too few braces for any height, removing asbestos tiles with no kind of asbestos equipment, even one side of my respirator was taped up because the filter was missing and he was too cheap to buy them. Not to mention you can have a heart attack from wearing a FUNCTIONAL respirator if it hasnt been cleared by a doctor. No boots. Cutting wood with no safety glasses. Cutting ceramic tiles with a grinder with no blade guard on it. I explained to the OSHA inspector that all of us were very good friends of the owners and knew the risks when we woke up this morning and I swear to you he got off with a warning.

That was the last job I ever worked wor anyone else again and I swore I would never make anyone risk their lives like that. That boss was a low bidder… these are just one of the differences.


#8

Yes that could be an osha violation. But lets be serious here. How many guys are out there without the correct insurance? Let alone licenced. There are many things in this trade that are done wrong. Thats why we get a bad name from time to time. As far as using cushions low pitch only when sunny to avoid scuffing of the shingle. Not for any pitch work.


#9

I’ve seen the foam pads used quite a bit around here.
Mostly on steep roofs. The roofer will bracket and plank the bottom and then run the rest off the pads. Just tossing them up on the shingles and moving along.
Seems like a decent way to get to the last few feet of a steep hip, but then I would really worry about the foam rolling and losing balance. That would be a mess.
No thanks, I’ll set a plank.


#10

I call them Mexican cushins.

Most Mex’s in my area use 16 penny nails and ropes not meant for life lines while roofing on steep roofs.

Ever see a 10/12 or 12/12 roofed without any boards? I have and I couldn’t believe it until I saw it. A Mex would have one hand on a thin rope and the other to nail down the roofing material. With a dozen or so doing this it went quick but was still time consuming especially close to the bottom.

A Mex fell off the roof the other day in New Prague, MN were my father lives. A builder told me the story of a Mex roofer who tripped carrying a bundle and died on the job and OSHA never came to the job once. His family must have either dumped him off a bridge or barried him in a back yard some place in MN.


#11

Shame on all those that hire companies for the illegal Mexican labor rate. Frickin slave traders is all they are.

Here’s what I use on the steep repairs.


#12

Aaron, you keep talking about illegal-Mexican labor as if all Mexicans are illegal aliens. That is not the case, there are plenty in the U.S. that are here legally, and they are willing to do much of the work that white-America will not do.


#13

actually i think some good ole american boys came up with the trailer couch foam.
hey , it works for alot of people.

not me.

i like a good ole 2x4 with some 16 p nails under my feet.

other than the cushions, looks like hes/shes doin a pretty good job on that repair.

gweeedo


#14

[quote=“dennis”]I’ve seen the foam pads used quite a bit around here.
Mostly on steep roofs. The roofer will bracket and plank the bottom and then run the rest off the pads. Just tossing them up on the shingles and moving along.
Seems like a decent way to get to the last few feet of a steep hip, but then I would really worry about the foam rolling and losing balance. That would be a mess.
No thanks, I’ll set a plank.[/quote]

Bingo. Thats exactly what happened to my friend, foam rolled on him and he fell 30 feet.


#15

Nope, you assume too much.


#16

Dennis,
How about a picyure of the flashing job on the chimney after it’s completed.
We might then be better able to judge the quality of the workmanship involved.
It looked to me like they had torn out a lot to do a thorough job of reflashing.
I don’t use cushions to kneel on,but lets judge the end product here and not pre-judge the work 'cause we don’t use pillows.


#17

Good idea slater. I’ll see about getting a picture of the completed work.

Can’t say I have’nt done stupid risky things myself. Like using a slate ripper as a quick foothold to reach a higher slate that needed replacing. :smiley:


#18

Hi Dennis,

I have set some things up to get the job done. I would never let one of my workers on.

But I have never thought of the slate ripper as a jack.


#19

Dennis,
I thought I was the only one crazy enough to use that trick-but not very often.
Some of the things an owner can do -you’d never ask a worker to do as Lefty said.


#20

What I’ve found fastest and easiest is to use 2x4’s with shingle tins under the tabs three rows up with Landmarks and four rows up with three tabs. On 10/12’s and up boards with tins every 6ft. Just have to make sure to pound the nails back in when they come close to the shingle butt.

Been doing it this way for 10 years and hundreds and hundreds of roofs with no leaks or issues. Saw my little brother fall off a roof when the board he nailed in slipped out due to too many shingles on it and his weight. Since then all tins w/ boards that are going to be loaded with extra shingles or a lot of foot traffic get four nails. My older brother once had a shingle tin board slip out on a 12/12 (he’s not the brightest guy must of had one nail in each tin!!!). Luckily it was on a dormer over a 4/12 so he just shook it off. Never met a guy who’s nailed/stapled himslef as many times as he has.

That reminds me of a funny ocurance I saw a couple weeks back. My really hot woman roofer worker tacked her finger near to me. The tack went in at an angle on her pointer finger. I said, “Can I take it out?” She said sure and when I popped it out I heard the strangest laugh I’ve heard from a woman in my entire life. At that point I realized she was 100% roofing material!!!

Roofing jacks work good too but are too risky tossing off the roof, hitting people or landing wrong and getting bent. 2x4’s work good, there cheap and if they break you just get another one!