Add pitch to flat roof


#1

i have a flat roof garage office that leaks…is there a way to add a pitched roof instead? are there modular components that might keep this in a sensible budget? i wouldn’t mind adding clerestory windows or some other light source if i have to decap the whole structure.


#2

Hi,

Just frame an a-frame roof on top of what you have.

As for cost. Get a price from a contractor in your area.


#3

The problen is most likely not the roof pitch.


#4

tapered insulation…contact your local roofing contractor


#5

cricket anyone?
Crickets are made using tapered insulation to gain pitch to a flat or reversed pitch area of a roof, your stating you want to add a second floor space for reasonable money - regardless your going to need to re-roof so depending on what you mean by “reasonable” will depend on what way to go.
If cost is the overriding factor go with what roof boss says - if its the space thats going to be the main key its A frame time.
Aaron may have a sprayed on option for you as well.

Very little knowledge admittingly so on this industry - just passing along what I do know!


#6

crickets are a one or two sided tapered used to divert water away from a wall or other penetration.a saddle is a four sided taperd usually found between roof drains to insure positive water flow to those drains.you sound like the entire roof needs to be tapered…call an experienced contractor


#7

Are you sure you need to add slope? Maybe you just need a quality low-sloper. 1/8" per foot is adequate slope for most, if not all commercial systems.


#8

tapered insulation…contact your local roofing contractor

gweedo.


#9

How much pitch is there now?


#10

Leaks on flat roofs are not from having a flat roof. There are more flat roofs in the world than pitched. Pitching a small roof is unnesasary and not at all worth the costs


#11

That is actually incorrect. There are very few dead level roofs. Most of the roofs that some people refer to as flat are actually low-sloped roofs. They do indeed have slope that generally ranges from 1/8-inch to 1/2-inch per foot.


#12

[quote=“Cerberus”]

That is actually incorrect. There are very few dead level roofs. Most of the roofs that some people refer to as flat are actually low-sloped roofs. They do indeed have slope that generally ranges from 1/8-inch to 1/2-inch per foot.[/quote]

Im sure you know Im not talking about perfectly flat


#13

I assumed you weren’t talking about truly “flat” roofs, but then again you advised against adding slope to the roof. I will always recommend that a roof has slope to provide proper drainage. I don’t know that I would value-engineer slope out of a roof.


#14

He said it was a garage how big could it be. I was saying that the vast majority of roofing square footage in the world is flat. Flat roofs are not a problem. Even the old apartments that hold alot of water are no problem. A slope is preverable but not nesissary and most times not worth the extra costs but I have installed lots of tappered systems so if they would like it fine here is the cost. We just finished a shopping center of about 500 sq at one end was a bank and it got a tappered system but on the other end was a liquor store and it did not. Why? Because of money. They both got a modified cap so it wont be much difference in longevity. Almost all flat roofs hold some ponding water


#15

I have to go with what seems like majority opinion, a flat roof can last as long as, say, shingles. A flat roof can not hang with a slate or copper standing seam, all roofs being properly installed, I’d agree with that also. But a quality flat roof can last many many decades with some minor preventative maintenance possible. How long are you planning on living Cerberus? I think you know the real problem is the roofer, not the roof.


#16

the above being said, my answser to the author is that I don’t think you should spend money framing, sheathing, and roofing a garage when you could just find the right roofer and probably never have to worry about it again. Think about it.


#17

Modified bitumen cap sheets will absorb water. Check out the perm (water permeance rating) It NEEDS pitch to it, 1/8" minimum.


#18

are you talkin bout a torchdown cap or mopgrade cap sheet?
torchdown is the only bitumen i know of.
i cant use mop grade cap.
it doesnt hold up to the sun.
shrinks and looses it granuals at ponding areas in a couple a years.
theres only one bitumen to me.
torchdown.

gweedo.


#19

All asphalts will absorb water if left to pond on it long enough.

Our polyureas do not…not that it has anything to do with this thread, but more of an blatant plug).


#20

bull