40# felt vs. TG-2


#1

Now that the sticker shock of my 45 squares of Cedarlite roof have worn off I am left finalizing the spec. One big thing that I am running into is that my good friend who runs a commercial roofing company strongly recommends that I use 2 layers of TG-2 instead of 40# felt and the residential roofers that I am working with are not familiar with the product.

Just to refresh everyones memory the house is in Southern California,the roof is 4/12 pitch, and the city will only allow me to use wood shake or Cedarlite.

My question is… is TG-2 that much better than 40# felt?

Thanks,

Ron


#2

I am on southern california myself and I only use TG-2 (tileguard underlayment) on my tile jobs .

Reason that i prefer this is because of its elasticity. There are a few #40 felts out there which crack easily.

TG-2 also doesnt wrinkle as much so this helps when doing your layout.

Down here where im at TG-2 is consider one of the best choices of tile underlayment.

Also compare to others the surface is not as slippery.

As a contractor i can honestly tell you i wont put anything else under my tile. :wink:


#3

I have not used the TG-2 product myself. The information I know of is the product is a type of Water & Ice shield
SBS product. It only covers 2 sq.s per roll. I am not
Familier with its cost. TG-2 is SBS Modified Asphalt Coated Glass Fiber Mat Material.You Can not store it in direct sun. Felt 40# I am not aware of such an item. There is 30# Felt Paper. When you talk about 40# to me this refers to Rubber Membrane roofing type items such as exp: Modified Bitumen . The Cedarlite(Cedar shake Roofs)you should look to their manufactures recommendations for the installation they require. Then Figure what your cost factors and what roof needs you have before you decide.

Most Cedar shake roof systems I have done have: requirments of 30 # Felt underlayment, with doubling it in valley areas. You could used Ice & Water shield at the eaves first,then 30# felt the remainder of the roof. Use the Ice & Water shield in the valleys.

This would make a more cost efficient and economical way to achieve your waterproofing/felting underlayment.

Ice & Water shield covers 1 or 2 sq./per roll. the cost can be $40-60.00 per roll(my area). You need to calculate your footages to figure how many rolls you will need. 30# Felt paper covers about 2 sqs. The cost Is Less exspensive per roll(takes 2 rolls of 30# Felt as compared to #15 Felt 1 rl. covers 4 sq.s)You could always lay two layeres of 15#. You need to figure labor cost for this though, it will be more.

I hope this gives you good options for comparison.


#4

[quote=“War_Goddess_A”]I have not used the TG-2 product myself. The information I know of is the product is a type of Water & Ice shield
SBS product. [/quote]

It is SBS but is not peel and stick is just an underlayment

Cedarlite is a Tile Roof . The name is only because its meant to resemble real cedar shakes but is not cedar.
I have done some roofs with this material it has two premade holes for nailing.

[quote=“War_Goddess_A”]
Most Cedar shake roof systems I have done have: requirments of 30 # Felt underlayment [/quote]

Yes shakes use #30 shake liner but this is not a shake roof #30 is a bad choice for tile in my eyes.

[quote=“War_Goddess_A”]
I hope this gives you good options for comparison.[/quote]

Goddes even do you have good intentions I think you are mistaking Cedarlite tile for real Cedarshakes and this might confuse swmrdrn


#5

OK , People. I seen wood shakes or Cedarlite. My mistake. BUT, I went to Cedarlite info.

NOTE: You can still use same info I provided for CEDAR SHAKE ROOFS, according to their specs.

So I am Not 100% Wrong BUT Right with my option Information.

HA


#6

QRFL: Your comments are in line with what my roofer friend said. What do you thing the cost difference is between TG2 and 40# felt?

You said that San Diego is slow right now… why don’t you come up to LA and do my roof.


#7

FOR u Ron:

monierlifetile.com/technical … lation.pdf

check out first paragraph to right top


#8

[quote=“War_Goddess_A”]FOR u Ron:

monierlifetile.com/technical … lation.pdf

check out first paragraph to right top[/quote]

Thank you for looking that up. It appears that a single layer of 30# is the minimum underlayment spec. I think that the question is “is TG2 worth the extra money?”.


#9

[quote=“swmrdrn”]
You said that San Diego is slow right now… why don’t you come up to LA and do my roof.[/quote]

Ill pm you my info check your messages :wink:

To me it is is all i use .

[quote=“War_Goddess_A”]

So I am Not 100% Wrong BUT Right with my option Information.

HA[/quote]

Hehe 8)


#10

My Contractor Friend says Yes, with the pitch being 4/12, he says it would be well worth it to have a better waterproof underlayment under the tile.


#11

ching ching boo boo toi…your all speaking chinese to me with the tile and shake talk :cry:


#12

Marshall, I’m with you (please pardon me as I crap on / hijack this thread a bit).

I want to learn, however… expand my options. From the limited tile work I’ve done (mostly repairs where the customer lived on a golf course & every so often they’d hire me to come & replace individual tiles that were NOT nailed even though there were holes)… from my limited work, it seems the more difficult part would be in properly laying out the horizontal purlins & cutting out the end caps / valley joints.

For you tile folks, am I wrong?

Also, Goddess, remember this customer is in So. Cal - no real need for a true Ice & Water shield unless they want to go high end & overprotect (in which case I might lay a shorter line if there’s some bushes or trees that might cause issues or maybe @ the ridge cap ends / hip tips / bases of valleys).


#13

[quote=“RanchHandRoofing”]from my limited work, it seems the more difficult part would be in properly laying out the horizontal purlins & cutting out the end caps / valley joints.

For you tile folks, am I wrong?

[/quote]

on new roofs :

The hardest part on any tile job is to make the cuts on hips and valleys .

Second hardest is the concrete work on high profiles like S-tile .

you just show up after tear-off day , fix bad wood , dry the roof in , do your metal work , snap your lines , nail your ridge, hip boards , then have the tile loaded , lay it down do your mud and bye-bye


#14

Gee, Q… that’s all?

Where do I sign up for the tile jobs being handed out, then? :wink:


#15

Haha ill tell you when i find out myself :mrgreen:


#16

The trickiest part to laying down a concrete tile roof with battens is doing proper measurements before you install your batten boards so all of the courses come out even from the eave to the ridge.

For the guys who know what they are doing, it is only a small step, but if you do not know the reduction of the exposue to come up with equal rows all the way through, the roof can look like a f’ng disaster zone.

Also, another trick is to have a good eye to make sure none of the tiles resting on the battens are starting to get cocked to one side.

It doesn’t seem like much at first, but it will continually increase as each successivbe course is installed.

Ed


#17

Tileguard does cost quite a bit more (about 3x), but the roof will only last as long as the underlayment, so we use double Tileguard to make the roof last as long as possible. A large part of the cost of the roof is labor, so deferring the next re-roof should make up the difference. We do a lot of repairs on tract homes that are less than 10 years old where the developer installed 15# because it was the min. required.


#18

MBTechnology also has an SBS modified underlayment called layfast TU-35. For tile most go with their TU-43 which is more heavier and you don’t need to double ply it.


#19

I was talking to a guy yesterday who said that tile leaks & it’s really the underlayment / deck cover that does the work - the tile does the heavy lifting, but for the most part water WILL penetrate.

Due to this penetration, the underlayment is absolutely suggested for the best possible deck protection.

Is this correct?


#20

if the tile your installin lets water through and is only up the for looks and to protect the sub roof from the elements, then you need a good subroof.
30# is not a good subroof.

gweedo.