3/12 pitch roof in Illinois...should I buy this house?


#1

First of all, please excuse my ignorance on this topic!!

We placed an offer on a ranch-style home with a 3/12 pitch roof. The home inspector revealed some sagging over the garage as well as shingles that are beyond their useful lives. He recommended a total roof replacement. After doing a bit on online research, I’m now concerned about having such a low-pitched roof in an area of the country that receives a good amount of snow (Chicago).

My questions are this:

  1. Even if we replace the roof, are we setting ourselves up for potential problems down the road with such a low pitch?
  2. If we go ahead and buy the home, is there anything that can be done to prevent the problems that usually occuur on a 3/12 pitch roof?
  3. Is changing the picth of the roof a ridiculous idea…is it way too costly?

We’re going to have a roofer come out and look at it next week, but in the meantime, any thoughts would be helpful!


#2

Hi,

Are all the houses in the neoghborhood the same style?


#3

The neighborhood has several different styles of homes most of which have roofs with higher pitches. There is another home down the street that is the same model as the one we’re looking at, but its roof has a higher pitch too!


#4

What neighborhood is it in?


#5

The home is in Wheaton, a western suburb.


#6

Hi,

Trying to find someone to tell you it is okay may be hard.

My insurance does not allow me to give you strutual advice. This will be most roofers. The liability if something does happen is I will be out of bussiness.

So I can tell you to look around your neighborhood. This is anywhere within 25 miles. If there are homes with the pitch you have. You are safe with the design. Now your house may have a flaw. This will not be design. It will be installer.

Most manufactured homes will have this pitch. Do you have manufactured homes in your area.

If you need someone to look at the home for you to feel safe. Make sure that he is licensed for structual issues.

This does not include a home inspector. Most of them lost there other job and this was and easy entry job.


#7

e-mail aaron hes a god in wheaton!!!


#8

do not put a shingle roof on a low slope if you are in a freezing climate.
that is comon sence.
use a solid (flat) roof system on your low slope, and it will last longer than any shinlgle.

gweedo.


#9

We have done several jobs with 3/12 pitches and our first two done are still in service after 20+ years … both located in Aurora, IL - Just west of Wheaton …

We will apply a built-up flat style roof for this application and when properly done we anticipate at least 30+ years of service from the roof …

We are located in Aurora and do service the Wheaton Area … I have actual pictures and addresses of 3/12 roofs for your review, if interested …

Cost of such a job runs in the $5 to $9 square foot range depending on final surface selected for the roof and insulation requirements …


#10

My questions are this:

  1. Even if we replace the roof, are we setting ourselves up for potential problems down the road with such a low pitch?

N o - Not when you install a roof designed for a 3/12 … If shingles are your choice, then figure only getting 5 to 10 years … but if you install a BUR (flat type roof) you will get 30+ years and more …

  1. If we go ahead and buy the home, is there anything that can be done to prevent the problems that usually occuur on a 3/12 pitch roof?

As stated above if done right 3/12 pitch is not a problem …

  1. Is changing the picth of the roof a ridiculous idea…is it way too costly?

Changing the pitch is a good idea … Price it out …


#11

Gweedo, we know you’re always hoggin’ for a metal roof, however this customer’s primary concern is due to snow load & the excessive weight that can often be a part of this kind of low slope.

Since the house has obvious years behind it, they are probably also wondering if there are other ‘hidden problems’ that might only now or in the next 5- 10 years show up.

& Here is something I also tell people looking to possibly buy a house & almost immediately have a roof redone with a layover:

“OK, so you do a layover. Keep the house for 10 years. Then, put it on the market. The buyers will have to be told by disclosure that it’s got 2 layers & they will either have to consider a re-roof with the added expense of a 2nd layer tearoff (or) if they should have to try & sell it then THEY have the problem of having to sell a wnd layer that will almost certainly n eed a repair or two layer peel within this ‘3rd owner’s’ term of ownership…”

My point here is consider your downline issues, not just what’s going to affect this particular term of ownership.

If you really like the area & all other considerations about the house, plus are somewhat sure you’ll get a proper ROI on your expense to do a re-trussing, then the aggravation & time to do a trussover or retruss is worth it.

My .02 cents, anyhow.